Academic Component 

 

Domestic students

A minimum of two consecutive semesters of a modern foreign language for KU credit.

(Latin and Ancient Greek do not count.)

 

AND three courses with a modern, international focus from 3 different departments

(2 departments for students in STEM fields)

 

International students

Pass the English Proficiency Exam through the Applied English Center (AEC), or receive an English requirement waiver;

****Native English-speakers need two consecutive semesters of a modern foreign language for KU credit.

 

AND 2 courses with a modern, international focus + 1 Humanities or Social Science course.

 

***To count towards GAP, you must earn at least a C in the course.***

 

 

 

GAP-Certified Courses

 

 

EASTERN CIVILIZATION

ECIV 104 Eastern Civilizations
This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia, and explores the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. Course materials include translations and discussions of original sources. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. Does not complete major requirement. Not open to students with credit in ECIV 304. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Clements, Jacob
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 23813
LEC Clements, Jacob
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20454
ECIV 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Eastern Civilization. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECIV 304 Eastern Civilizations
This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia, and explores the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. Course materials include translations and discussions of original sources. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. Not open to students with credit in ECIV 104. If majoring in EALC and have completed ECIV 104, see major advisor about completing the ECIV 304 major requirement. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gerbert, Elaine
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 4041 - LAWRENCE
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20255
ECIV 305 Eastern Civilizations Honors
An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia. By reading translations of original source materials, the student is able to see the interaction among the various cultures as well as their essential continuity. The course is most appropriate for students without any background in Asian culture. Similar to ECIV 304, but reading and writing assignments reflect the fact that this is an honors course. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECONOMICS

ECON 110 The Economics of Globalization
The course emphasizes the application of economic methods of analysis to the public policy issues that globalization creates. Topics covered may include the following: winners and losers from trade; links between trade and labor markets; links between trade and foreign investment; the international financial system and exchange rates; outsourcing and multinational corporations; international institutions and regional trade agreements. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 505 History of Economic Analysis
The history of intellectual efforts to understand economic phenomena and the impact of these efforts on the social and economic development of the modern world. Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 105 or (ECON 142 and ECON 144.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC El-Hodiri, Mohamed
MW 12:30-01:45 PM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27969

ECON 510 Energy Economics
The application of basic economic concepts and methods to the analysis of energy markets, regulation, and policies. Topics covered include energy trends and projections, economic growth and resource exhaustion, the organization and regulation of fossil fuel industries, nuclear power and non-conventional energy technologies, the world oil market, energy conservation, environmental pollution, and national energy policies in the U.S. and other developed as well as developing countries. Prerequisite: ECON 142 and ECON 144 or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908

ECON 535 Economic History of Europe
An introductory study of European economic history from the Middle Ages to the 1980s. Investigates the sources of economic growth, and the interaction between economic forces and social institutions. Topics covered will include the rise of commerce, the agricultural and industrial revolutions, imperialism, the Great Depression, and European recovery after World War II. (Same as HIST 528.) Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 536 Economic Issues of the European Union
A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as EURS 536.) Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 563 Current Economic Issues of East Europe
An institutional and theoretical analysis of the issues arising from the transition from a command economy to a free market-oriented economy. With emphasis on the former Soviet Union, topics will include: assessment of the central planning experience; changes in property rights and their effect on resource allocation; market mechanisms and how they work when market institutions are at the formative stage; and public interest under privatization. Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 582 Economic Development
An introduction to economic growth and development in high and low income countries, problems of development, and development policy. Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 142. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Duncan, William
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM SNOW 452 - LAWRENCE
3 28701
ECON 583 Economic Issues of East Asia
This course will study the economics of the East Asian countries, especially China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. Topics to be covered include economic growth, development and change, international trade, inflation, unemployment, income distribution, and urbanization. Emphasis will be on the post World War II period. Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 586 Economic Issues in China
This course studies the Chinese economy, especially during the post-1979 reform period, and its relationship to the development of the Greater China Circle (China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan). Topics to be covered include economic development during the pre-1979 reform period, economic reform, and its impacts on China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and lessons from the Chinese economic reforms. Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 587 Economic Development of Africa
This course studies current economic issues facing African countries. It studies the general characteristics of several African economies and examines the impact of economic development policies, including those of international organizations, on the economies of Africa. Topics include poverty, income inequality, debt, foreign investment policies, trade policies, and government regimes. Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Asiedu, Elizabeth
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SNOW 452 - LAWRENCE
3 27909

ECON 604 International Trade
An introduction to the nonmonetary theory of international trade, the cause and pattern of trade, the gains from trade, and the contemporary issues in international economic policy. Prerequisite: ECON 520 or ECON 524. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ECON 605 International Finance
This course surveys theories of exchange rate and balance of payments determination. Included are the elasticity approach, Keynesian models, and the monetary approach. The mechanics of foreign exchange trading, balance of payments accounting, and the working of the international monetary system are also discussed. Prerequisite: ECON 522. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Easterday, Michael
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4045 - LAWRENCE
3 18725
LEC Hakkio, Craig
W 04:10-06:40 PM REGN 356 - EDWARDS
3 27911

ENGLISH

ENGL 302 Topics in British Literature Since 1800: _____
Study of British literary works since 1800. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, topic, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 305 World Indigenous Literatures
A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as GIST 305/ISP 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 306 Global Environmental Literature
An examination of a variety of literary and other representations of human and non-human environments and environmentalism. Particular attention will be paid to how race, gender, class, sexuality, and geography produce and are produced by those representations. (Same as GIST 306.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Echterling, Clare
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20169
LEC Echterling, Clare
APPT- ONLNE KUEC - EDWARDS
3 22503
LEC Echterling, Clare
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20170
LEC Echterling, Clare
APPT- ONLNE KUEC - EDWARDS
3 22504
LEC Drake, Phillip
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM WES 1009 - LAWRENCE
3 23549

ENGL 309 The British Novel
Study of five or more significant novels representative of developments in the British novel of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 315 Studies in British Literature
For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program, an interdisciplinary program conducted with other humanities departments. British literature is studied in the context of visits to relevant sites such as London, the Lake District, and Edinburgh. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office is required. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 326 Introduction to African Literature
Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Saharan Africa. Brief attention is paid to historical development and to traditional literature. (Same as AAAS 332.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 339 Introduction to Caribbean Literature
Reading, analysis, and discussion of fiction, poetry, and drama from the Caribbean, including a small selection of Spanish, French, and Dutch Antillean works in translation. (Same as AAAS 333.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Anatol, Giselle
Tu 07:00-09:30 PM WES 1003 - LAWRENCE
3 28190

ENGL 342 Topics in Transcultural Literature, Language, or Rhetoric: _____
An introduction to a topic in the literatures, languages, or rhetorics of diverse cultural groups in the US or the world. A supermajority of the works considered were originally written in English. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 492 The London Review
This class meets one day a week throughout the semester and includes a nine-day visit to London over the spring break period. Students spend the early part of the semester selecting special interests, researching places to visit and study, and exchanging information. After the trip, students compile and publish a journal entitled "The London Review", which is comprised of essays, photos, art work, and other reflections about their experience in London. Prerequisite: Admission to University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 530 Irish Literature and Culture: _____
Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as EURS 512.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 536 Readings in the Holocaust
An examination of Holocaust literature, which may include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and film. Theoretical concerns may include such issues as memory, trauma, representation, imagination, exile, alienation, silence, the body and emotions, and intergenerational transmission. Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 560 British Literature of the 20th Century: _____
Study of twentieth-century literary works. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 674 African Literature: _____
An advanced study of a topic, genre, or area of written and/or oral African literature. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of major works, as well as their cultural and historical contexts. The course also addresses central critical and theoretical debates in the field. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: At least one 300- or 400- level English course, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 764 Modern Irish Literature: _____
Intensive study of topics in modern Irish literature. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENGL 774 Topics in Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora: _____
An intensive study of the literatures of Africa and/or African diaspora (people of African descent dispersed around the world). This study will focus on the major characteristics of a particular period, genre, mode, and/or theme in literatures such as African, Caribbean, Afro-Brazilian, African American, African Canadian, Black British. Critical theories pertinent to writers and their work will be covered. Topics may include studies in drama, poetry, or the novel; migration narratives; literature of a particular era, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Negritude, or the Black Arts Movement; representations of gender, etc. As topics vary by semester, the course may be repeated for credit. (Same as AAAS 774.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

EVRN 103 Environment and History
Nature is our oldest home and newest challenge. This course surveys the environmental history of the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the present with a focus on the changing ecological role of humans. It analyzes cases of ecological stability, compares cultural attitudes toward nature, and asks why this ancient relationship seems so troubled. (Same as HIST 103.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EVRN 140 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change
This interdisciplinary course and laboratory sections survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as GEOG 140 and HIST 140.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM RIT 164 - LAWRENCE
5 17265
LBN
W 09:00-10:50 AM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18555
LBN
W 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18557
LBN
Th 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18558
LBN
F 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18556
LBN Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
Tu 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 28573

EVRN 144 Global Environment I: Discovery of Environmental Change, Honors
This interdisciplinary course surveys the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as GEOG 144 and HIST 144.) Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM RIT 164 - LAWRENCE
5 18552
LBN Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
Tu 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18538

EVRN 148 Scientific Principles of Environmental Studies
This course provides the scientific knowledge necessary to understand the changing relationships between humans and the natural environment, with an emphasis on the assessment of current environmental problems and critical evaluation of potential solutions. Major topics include fundamental scientific concepts and principles, interactions among the biological and physical components of the environment, implications of a growing human population, water resources, the atmosphere, climate, and energy sources. (Same as GEOG 148.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Nuckolls, Kathleen
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 17266
LEC Nuckolls, Kathleen
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 23669
LEC Nuckolls, Kathleen
MW 12:30-01:45 PM LEEP2 2420 - LAWRENCE
3 23670

EVRN 149 Scientific Principles of Environmental Studies, Honors
This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of EVRN 148, designed for superior students. (Same as GEOG 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EVRN 150 Environment, Culture and Society
An introduction to geographic approaches to the study of the environment, emphasizing societal and cultural factors that influence human interaction with the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere. The course involves analysis of a broad range of contemporary environmental issues from the local to global scales. (Same as GEOG 150.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EVRN 200 Study Abroad Topics In: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Environmental Studies. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EVRN 336 Ethics, Ideas and Nature
This course examines the ethical frameworks developed for thinking about, using, and protecting the natural world. Examples of topics include indigenous approaches to nature, the history of ecological ideas, environmental movements, the role of the state in managing resources, utilitarianism and progressivism, environmental lawmaking, wilderness advocacy, nature and theology, the rights of nature, and environmental justice. Students are introduced to the theories of duty ethics, justice ethics, utilitarianism, and rights ethics, and required to apply ethical decision making to contemporary and historical environmental issues. Multiple perspectives on the history of human interactions with nature demonstrate the importance of reflecting upon the value systems inherent in human-centered environmental ethics and nature-centered environmental ethics. (Same as HIST 336.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Boynton, Alex
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 21792
LEC Boynton, Alex
MW 12:30-01:45 PM WES 4035 - LAWRENCE
3 22644
LEC Boynton, Alex
Tu 03:00-05:50 PM BEST 310 - EDWARDS
3 28960

EVRN 425 Global Water Scarcity
Though natural factors are introduced, this course focuses primarily on the human factors that contribute to global water scarcity. This course also discusses the consequences of water scarcity and its effects on society. Prerequisite: EVRN 148 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EVRN 553 Comparative Environmental Politics
This course compares environmental politics and policies across a number of countries, including those in North America, Western Europe, East Asia, and Latin America. (Same as POLS 553.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EUROPEAN STUDIES

EURS 150 Study Abroad Topics in European Studies: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the 100-level (Freshman/Sophomore level). Coursework must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty advisor in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 302 European Culture and Society 1945 to Present
The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HUM 302.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 329 History of War and Peace
A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 430 European Civilization in World Context: _____
An introduction to the literature of encounters between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HUM 430.) Prerequisite: HUM 114 or HUM 204 and HUM 115 or HUM 205. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 500 Seminar in European Studies
Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern European civilization. By discussing both classic and contemporary, controversial readings each week and writing several papers during the semester, students acquire an understanding of the development of modern European culture and society and Europe's contemporary problems. Topics for discussions and papers are drawn from the following subjects: the economic and political integration of European states; modernism and anti-modernism in European culture; imperialism, migration, and ethnic and racial division in European society; democracy versus dictatorship; American-European relations; mass culture, urban development, and the welfare state; and contrasts and comparisons between European Cultures--East and West, North and South. Seminar discussions are led by invited European Studies faculty as well as the instructor or instructors. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 501 Research for Honors in European Studies
Research for a European Studies honors project, on a topic chosen in conjunction with the faculty advisor. Emphasis on independent study and writing. Open to students with previous coursework that counts toward the European Studies co-major at the 400 level, an overall 3.25 GPA, and at least a B+ average in advanced work in European Studies. Prerequisite: At least one course for the EURS co-major at the 400 level and permission of the Academic Director. IND.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 502 Senior Honors Thesis in European Studies
Open to European Studies majors doing their senior thesis for Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500, 15 hours toward the Co-Major, and approval of Honors thesis by European Studies Committee. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EURS 501. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Kelly, Van
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 18751
IND Vanchena, Lorie
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 11347
EURS 503 Europe Today
This intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on current social, political, and economic changes in Europe. Topics include European integration and the European Union, the conflict between nationalism and European consciousness, NATO and U.S.-European relations, and international business in Europe. The seminar will include guest lectures from an international array of scholars, political officials, and business representatives, as well as site visits to their institutions and companies. The seminar takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and enrollment is restricted to students accepted in the KU Summer Institute for European Studies study abroad program. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 507 Research in European Collections
This course allows students in the European Studies Co-Major and related disciplines to receive credit for research related to European Collections in one or more of the following institutions: Watson and Spencer Research Libraries, the Dole Institute, the Eisenhower and Truman Presidential Libraries, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Research and Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, and the Winston Churchill Collection at the Westminster College Library in Fulton, Missouri. May be taken in place of EURS 501 by European Studies Honors Students if taken for three credit hours. Permission of instructor necessary. IND.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 511 Topics in European Studies: _____
A study of significant themes, movements, or problems in European history, literature, politics, society, or culture. May also relate European issues to issues in other world areas (Africa, North America, Asia, etc.) May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Vanchena, Lorie
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM FR 207 - LAWRENCE
3 21675
EURS 512 Irish Literature and Culture: ______
Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 530.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 536 Economic Issues of the European Union
A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as ECON 536.) Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

EURS 580 Directed Study
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Vanchena, Lorie
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 16465

EURS 604 The European Union
This course will introduce students to the politics of the European Union. The course will cover three closely connected topics. First, it will discuss the institutional make-up of the EU, such as the European commission, the European parliament, the European Council, and the European court of justice. It will assess how well these institutions deal with the growing importance of transnational issues, such as migration and economic policy issues. Second, the course will examine how national governments pursue national interests at the level of the European Union. Third, the class will study how well the EU represents the citizens of European countries. Finally, the course will assess the extent to which the EU has successfully developed into a supra-national federation. (Same as POLS 643.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

FMS 302 Undergraduate Studies Seminar in: _____
Course organized any given semester to examine a particular studies topic or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Willmott, Kevin
Tu 07:00-10:00 PM SUM 426 - LAWRENCE
3 27625
LEC Miner, Joshua
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM SUM 418 - LAWRENCE
3 21050
LEC Schuster, Neal
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SUM 502 - LAWRENCE
3 28154
LEC Kirk, Laura
MW 01:00-02:50 PM SUM 403 - LAWRENCE
3 23970

FMS 312 History of the International Sound Film to 1950
A survey of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the international sound film 1929 to 1950. Emphasis on European National Cinemas. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 315 Survey of Japanese Film
This course surveys the major developments in and critical approaches to twentieth-century Japanese film. Focusing mostly on narrative films, Survey of Japanese Film introduces students to basic methodological issues in Japanese film history, especially questions of narrative, genre, stardom, and authorship. We examine Japanese cinema as an institution located within specific contexts focusing on the ways in which this institution shapes gender, class, ethnic, and national identities. This course examines how patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception have influenced film aesthetics and film style over the last century. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 315.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 413 Asian Media Studies
This course examines new and emerging media in East Asia and how the media industries of East Asia function. Using recent scholarship and industry data on contemporary cyberculture, music studies, and television industries of East Asia we examine how such factors as globalization, post-colonialism, censorship, emerging technology, and national media legislation affect regional and transnational media industries in Japan, South Korea, and Mainland China/Taiwan/Hong Kong. (Same as EALC 413.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 540 Cuban Cinema
This course explores Cuban cinema from 1959 to the present day. Special attention is paid to the representations of Cuban history, cultural politics, and the political-economic conditions of production in Cuba. In addition, the Cuban-American community and their contributions or reactions to Cuban film are discussed. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and viewing Cuban films, the class examines a variety of topics related to Cuban cinema, history, and contemporary concerns. This course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 541 Asian Film
Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the impact of key cultural, economic, and political issues on each film industry. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as EALC 541.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 543 Contemporary Japanese Film
Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 543.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 544 African Film
A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films are examined. (Same as AAAS 555.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 544 African Film
A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films are examined. (Same as AAAS 555.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 620 International Women Filmmakers
This course examines films made by women around the world. Mainstream and independent fiction, documentary, and experimental works will be screened and discussed. The objectives of the course are: 1) to learn the variety of films made by women and the conditions of their production, distribution reception. 2) to interrogate the idea of women's cinema as `counter-cinema'. We will acquire tools for analyzing films in terms of economic, aesthetic, cultural, and political circumstance by women of different countries, classes, races, ethnicities, genders, and sexual preferences. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 716 Cinemas of the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay
This course will examine the cinemas of three neighboring South American countries to find similar themes and some differences between them historically, politically, and culturally. Themes will include: gender and nation, political repression during dictatorship, globalization and the cinema, youth culture in the Southern Cone, and representations of race and ethnicity, immigration and identity in contemporary cinema. In addition to the lecture sessions taught in tandem with FMS 316, additional research component, lecture presentation, and class meeting are also required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FMS 743 Contemporary Japanese Film
Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We will survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class includes discussion, reports, and individual research papers. This course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 743.) SEM.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FRENCH

FREN 100 French for Reading Knowledge
Special course for candidates for advanced degrees in other departments. Fundamentals of grammar and reading of material of medium difficulty. Intended primarily for graduate students, but open also to seniors planning graduate study. Does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study of French. Conducted in English. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 104 Elementary French, Overseas
Basic language instruction in French for beginners participating in study abroad programs in France or a French-speaking country. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 107 Elementary French I for the Professional Schools
Essentials of French grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing French. Introduction to French business culture. Three hours of class per week. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 108 Elementary French II for the Professional Schools
Essentials of French grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing French. Introduction to French business culture. Three hours of class per week. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 107 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 109 Elementary French III for the Professional Schools
Essentials of French grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing French. Introduction to French business culture. Three hours of class per week. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 108 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 110 Elementary French I
Five hours of class per week. A balanced approach stressing understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 08:00-08:50 AM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11380
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11373
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 18257
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 1047 - LAWRENCE
5 11374
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11375
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 12:00-12:50 PM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11376
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11377
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 02:00-02:50 PM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11378
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 03:00-03:50 PM WES 4043 - LAWRENCE
5 11379

FREN 111 Introduction to French I
Introduction to French for special purposes; no previous French required. Provides basic familiarity with the French language, focusing on speaking, listening, reading and the essentials of French grammar. Introduction to the culture of the French-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by videoconference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 112 Introduction to French II
Continuation of FREN 111. Further development of basic familiarity with the French language, focusing on speaking, listening, reading and the essentials of French grammar. Continued exploration of the culture of the French-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by videoconference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 111 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 113 Introduction to French III
Continuation of FREN 112. Further development of basic familiarity with the French language, focusing on speaking, listening, reading and the essentials of French grammar. Continued exploration of the culture of the French-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by videoconference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 112 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 120 Elementary French II
Five hours of class per week. A balanced approach stressing understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: FREN 110 or by departmental permission. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 1047 - LAWRENCE
5 23819
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 1047 - LAWRENCE
5 11381
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MTuWThF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 1047 - LAWRENCE
5 11382

FREN 152 France and the French
A comprehensive, interdisciplinary survey of French culture that may include topics ranging from the earliest times to the present, with particular attention to literature, the arts, thought, politics, society, food, and customs. Taught in English. Does not fulfill any requirement in the French major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in French. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Scott, Paul
TuTh 12:00-01:15 PM WES 4068 - LAWRENCE
3 20161

FREN 230 Intermediate French I
Third-semester course stressing oral and written work in French; systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. (See also FREN 231, FREN 234.) Prerequisite: FREN 120 or by departmental permission. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 11383
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 22534
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 11387
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 11384
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 11385
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 03:00-03:50 PM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 11386

FREN 231 Intermediate French I, Honors
Similar in approach and content to FREN 230; smaller class size; open to students who had done very good to excellent work in previous French classes. Prerequisite: Grade of B or A in FREN 120 or departmental permission. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Booker, John
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 2066 - LAWRENCE
3 11388

FREN 234 Intermediate French I and II
One-semester course meeting five times a week for six hours credit. Material same as in FREN 230 and FREN 240. (FREN 234, FREN 240, FREN 241--each completes foreign language requirement.) Prerequisite: FREN 120 or by departmental permission. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MTuWThF 12:00-12:50 PM WES 1047 - LAWRENCE
6 13868

FREN 240 Intermediate French II
Continuation of FREN 230. (FREN 234, FREN 240, FREN 241--each completes foreign language requirement.) (See also FREN 241.) Prerequisite: FREN 230, FREN 231, or by departmental permission. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM FR 206 - LAWRENCE
3 22533
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 11389
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM FR 206 - LAWRENCE
3 11390
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM FR 206 - LAWRENCE
3 11391
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
Weatherley, Gillian
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM FR 206 - LAWRENCE
3 23823

FREN 241 Intermediate French II, Honors
Similar in approach and content to FREN 240; smaller class size; open to students who have done very good to excellent work in previous French classes. Prerequisite: A grade of A in FREN 230 or FREN 231, or departmental permission. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 310 French Phonetics
A course in practical phonetics with exercises stressing rhythm, intonation, and individual sounds. Prerequisite: FREN 240, FREN 241, or by departmental permission. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kelly, Mary
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 16800
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MW 03:00-04:15 PM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 15093

FREN 315 Le Francais Pratique
Supplementary non-major language course that can be a sequel to the first four semesters of French. Primarily for students studying abroad. Covers vocabulary study, oral exercises, discussion of texts, writing, and free conversation. Prerequisite: FREN 230/231 or FREN 234, FREN 240/241. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 326 Introduction to French Literature
Analysis of selected texts from various genres; special emphasis on explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 301. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Fourny, Diane
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 11392
LEC Pasco, Allan
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 21630

FREN 326 Introduction to French Literature
Analysis of selected texts from various genres; special emphasis on explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 301. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Fourny, Diane
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 11392
LEC Pasco, Allan
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 21630

FREN 330 French Language and Civilization I
A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad programs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 330 French Language and Civilization I
A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad programs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 340 French Language and Civilization II
A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad Programs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 340 French Language and Civilization II
A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad Programs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 350 Applied French Grammar and Composition I
Systematic grammar review with extensive practice in writing French. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 352 French for Journalism and Business
Practical acquisition of skills necessary to understand the language of journalism and business. Prerequisite: FREN 301. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 375 Intermediate French Conversation
Three meetings per week. Guided discussions designed to increase fluency, improve pronunciation, and acquire vocabulary. Sections limited to twelve students. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or concurrent enrollment in FREN 301. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Bourgeois, Christine
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 11393

FREN 376 Advanced French Conversation
Three meetings per week. Guided discussions designed to increase fluency, improve pronunciation, and knowledge of French culture and language. Classes have centered around topics such as the French Revolution, the Arts, Renaissance Festivals, and French cinema. Sections limited to twelve students. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: FREN 375. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 401 Paris, City of Lights and Legends
An exploration of the French capital from its origins to present as emblem and icon of the social, literary, cultural, and political development of the French nation and of French ideals. Topics include great persons, events, works, symbols, and myths since the founding of the city to the present. Taught in English. Does not fulfill any requirement in the French major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 405 French Literature in Translation
Readings and discussions of representative great masterpieces of French literature from the medieval Arthurian romances and chansons de geste to the present, with particular emphasis on the question of the interrelations of form and content. Includes such authors as Rabelais, Montaigne, Racine, Moliere, Voltaire, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Gide, Camus, and Beckett. Conducted in English. A reading knowledge of French is extremely useful but not a requirement. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 405 French Literature in Translation
Readings and discussions of representative great masterpieces of French literature from the medieval Arthurian romances and chansons de geste to the present, with particular emphasis on the question of the interrelations of form and content. Includes such authors as Rabelais, Montaigne, Racine, Moliere, Voltaire, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Gide, Camus, and Beckett. Conducted in English. A reading knowledge of French is extremely useful but not a requirement. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 406 Introduction to French Culture Through Film
Discussion of great masterpieces of French film from the silent era to the present, with a particular emphasis on how film portrays and conveys important aspects of French culture past and present. The works of a variety of film-makers may be covered, and may include among others Georges Melies, Jean Vigo, Jean Renoir, Abel Gance, Rene Clair, Marcel Carne, Jean Cocteau, Alain Resnais, Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Agnes Varda, Louis Malle, Eric Rohmer, and Claude Berri. Films will be shown in French with subtitles in English. Knowledge of French is useful, but not required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 406 Introduction to French Culture Through Film
Discussion of great masterpieces of French film from the silent era to the present, with a particular emphasis on how film portrays and conveys important aspects of French culture past and present. The works of a variety of film-makers may be covered, and may include among others Georges Melies, Jean Vigo, Jean Renoir, Abel Gance, Rene Clair, Marcel Carne, Jean Cocteau, Alain Resnais, Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Agnes Varda, Louis Malle, Eric Rohmer, and Claude Berri. Films will be shown in French with subtitles in English. Knowledge of French is useful, but not required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 410 Survey of French Culture I
A survey of the historical, philosophical, literary, and artistic development of France, from the beginning through the 17th century. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 410 Survey of French Culture I
A survey of the historical, philosophical, literary, and artistic development of France, from the beginning through the 17th century. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 420 Survey of French Culture II
Continuation of FREN 410, from the 18th century to the present. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 420 Survey of French Culture II
Continuation of FREN 410, from the 18th century to the present. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 430 La France d'Aujourd'Hui
Social, political, and economic trends from 1939 to present, with emphasis on period since 1968. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Bourgeois, Christine
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 21629

FREN 430 La France d'Aujourd'Hui
Social, political, and economic trends from 1939 to present, with emphasis on period since 1968. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Bourgeois, Christine
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 21629

FREN 431 French-Speaking World (Outside France)
Cultures of the some 235 million persons in the five world areas whose everyday and/or official language is French: Canada; Caribbean (e.g., Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique); Europe (e.g., Belgium, Switzerland); Africa and Indian Ocean (23 former French or Belgian colonies); Pacific (e.g., Tahiti, New Caledonia). Also French-speaking settlers in the United States (Louisiana, South Carolina, New England, Kansas). French presence in Indo-China and the Near East. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. (May be taken concurrently with FREN 301 and/or FREN 326.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Ziethen, Antje
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 23808

FREN 431 French-Speaking World (Outside France)
Cultures of the some 235 million persons in the five world areas whose everyday and/or official language is French: Canada; Caribbean (e.g., Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique); Europe (e.g., Belgium, Switzerland); Africa and Indian Ocean (23 former French or Belgian colonies); Pacific (e.g., Tahiti, New Caledonia). Also French-speaking settlers in the United States (Louisiana, South Carolina, New England, Kansas). French presence in Indo-China and the Near East. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. (May be taken concurrently with FREN 301 and/or FREN 326.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Ziethen, Antje
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 23808

FREN 432 Francophone African Literature
This course is an introduction of 20th Century African literature written in French, covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. (Same as AAAS 432.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and a 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 432 Francophone African Literature
This course is an introduction of 20th Century African literature written in French, covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. (Same as AAAS 432.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and a 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 440 Studies in French Culture: _____
Representative topics are: History of Paris, Role of Women in French Literature and Culture, Interrelationships of the Arts, French-speaking African Culture, Culture of French Canada. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission; may also be repeated as part of major in French language and culture. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 440 Studies in French Culture: _____
Representative topics are: History of Paris, Role of Women in French Literature and Culture, Interrelationships of the Arts, French-speaking African Culture, Culture of French Canada. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission; may also be repeated as part of major in French language and culture. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 450 French Literature of the Middle Ages
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 455 French Literature of the Renaissance
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 460 Identity, Absolutism, and Power in France, 1589-1715
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 462 French Literature of the Eighteenth Century
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 465 French Literature of the 19th Century
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Pasco, Allan
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 22538

FREN 470 French Literature of the Twentieth Century
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 470 French Literature of the Twentieth Century
Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 480 Studies in French Literature: _____
A study of a period, theme, group of authors, or movement. Subject matter will vary; may be taken more than once if subject differs. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and FREN 326. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 495 Directed Readings in French
May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Fields not covered by course work, and/or field of student's special interest. Conferences. Counts as humanities when taken for two or three hours. Prerequisite: Twenty-five hours of French and consent of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Booker, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 11394
IND Bourgeois, Christine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 22069
IND Fourny, Diane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 11395
IND Hayes, Bruce
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 11396
IND Jewers, Caroline
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 11397
IND Kelly, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 14534
IND Kelly, Van
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 11398
IND Pasco, Allan
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 11399

FREN 499 Honors in French
Various topics in French or Francophone literature, language, culture, or film. May be repeated for credit, total credit not to exceed six hours. Six hours of FREN 499 required for B.A. with Honors in French. Before enrolling, the student must obtain the approval of the faculty member who will direct the Honors project. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Booker, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 11400
IND Fourny, Diane
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 11401
IND Hayes, Bruce
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 16497
IND Jewers, Caroline
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 11402
IND Kelly, Mary
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 13795
IND Kelly, Van
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 11403
IND Pasco, Allan
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 11404
IND Scott, Paul
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 17074
IND Swanson, Kimberly
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 16379

FREN 500 Advanced French Phonetics
Advanced theory and practice of French pronunciation. Not open to students who have taken FREN 310, except by departmental permission. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or FREN 326 or graduate standing. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Swanson, Kimberly
MW 03:00-04:15 PM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 15095

FREN 530 Studies in Film: _____
Studies in an aspect of film, a director or group of directors. Emphasis on French film. Given in French or English. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kelly, Van
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM WES 1045 - LAWRENCE
3 28597

FREN 592 French Culture Through Film I, Beginnings to 1950
A survey of the major public images of French culture as surveyed in French silent and sound film from the early 1900s through World War II and its immediate aftermath. Students will view and discuss a selection of films that address crucial aspects of French culture such as (but not limited to) gender, war and peace, daily life, art and artists, tradition and revolution, city life versus country life, social classes, moral choice, and individual freedoms. The course will include discussion of the cultural and artistic significance of major French film movements like Poetic Realism. In addition to viewing and discussing films, students will read and analyze the writings of a number of French intellectuals, writers, and artists who have had a major influence on French culture as it appears in films from 1900-1950. May be taught in French or English. For students who already have some knowledge of French culture. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 593 French Culture Through Film II, 1950-Present
A survey of the major public images of French culture as surveyed in French silent and sound film from 1950 to present. Students will view and discuss a selection of films that address crucial aspects of French culture such as (but not limited to) gender, war and peace, daily life, art and artists, tradition and revolution, city life versus country life, colonialism and post-colonialism, social classes, moral choice, and individual freedoms. The course will include discussion of the cultural and artistic significance of major French film movements like the New Wave. In addition to viewing and discussing films, students will read and analyze the writings of a number of French intellectuals, writers, and artists who have had a major influence on French culture as it appears in films from 1950-present. May be taught in French or English. For students who already have some knowledge of French culture. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 600 Studies in: _____
Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 610 Theme et Version
Exercises in English-French and French-English translation, designed to enable the student to write with greater clarity and precision in both languages. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 620 Expository French Writing
Intensive practice in writing French, designed to clarify fine points of grammar and usage and to aid the student in developing an accurate and graceful prose style. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

FREN 703 Structure of Modern French
Linguistic analysis of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structure of modern French. Description in terms of current theories and models. Application of linguistic analyses to the teaching of French. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 100 World Regional Geography
An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM LIN 317 - LAWRENCE
3 13820
LEC
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM LIN 317 - LAWRENCE
3 11443
LEC Herlihy, Peter
TuTh 11:00-11:50 AM LIN 317 - LAWRENCE
3 11442
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 23632
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 23633
DIS
M 10:00-10:50 AM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 23634
DIS
W 10:00-10:50 AM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 23635
DIS
M 09:00-09:50 AM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 23636
DIS
W 09:00-09:50 AM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 23637

GEOG 101 World Regional Geography, Honors
An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. Open only to students in the College Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 102 People, Place, and Society
An examination of the relationships between humans and their environments. The course introduces students to basic concepts in human geography relating to economic activities, landscapes, languages, migrations, nations, regions, and religions. Serves as the basis for further course work in cultural, economic, political, population, and urban geography. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Warf, Barney
MW 10:00-10:50 AM LIN 317 - LAWRENCE
3 14538
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM LIN 225 - LAWRENCE
3 23626
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 23627
DIS
Tu 01:00-01:50 PM LIN 225 - LAWRENCE
3 23628
DIS
M 12:00-12:50 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 23629
DIS
Th 01:00-01:50 PM LIN 225 - LAWRENCE
3 23630
DIS
W 12:00-12:50 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 23631
LEC Warf, Barney
MW 01:00-01:50 PM LIN 317 - LAWRENCE
3 11444
DIS
Tu 08:00-08:50 AM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 19350
DIS
Th 08:00-08:50 AM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 19351
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 19352
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 19353
DIS
Tu 01:00-01:50 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 19354
DIS
Th 01:00-01:50 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 28353
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 17520

GEOG 103 Principles of Human Geography, Honors
An introduction to how human societies organize space and modify the world about them. Resultant patterns on the landscape are interpreted through principles of space perception, cultural ecology, diffusion, land use, and location theory. Comparisons are made between urban and rural areas and between subsistence and commercial societies. Open to students who have been accepted into the College Honors Program. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 140 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change
This interdisciplinary course and laboratory sections survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 140 and HIST 140.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM RIT 164 - LAWRENCE
5 17257
LBN
W 09:00-10:50 AM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18559
LBN
W 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18561
LBN
Th 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18562
LBN
F 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18560

GEOG 144 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change, Honors
This interdisciplinary course surveys the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 144 and HIST 144.) Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM RIT 164 - LAWRENCE
5 18553
LBN Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
Tu 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18539

GEOG 148 Scientific Principles of Environmental Studies
This course provides the scientific knowledge necessary to understand the changing relationships between humans and the natural environment, with an emphasis on the assessment of current environmental problems and critical evaluation of potential solutions. Major topics include fundamental scientific concepts and principles, interactions among the biological and physical components of the environment, implications of a growing human population, water resources, the atmosphere, climate, and energy sources. (Same as EVRN 148.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Nuckolls, Kathleen
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 17258
LEC Nuckolls, Kathleen
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 23673
LEC Nuckolls, Kathleen
MW 12:30-01:45 PM LEEP2 2420 - LAWRENCE
3 23674

GEOG 149 Scientific Principles of Environmental Studies, Honors
This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of GEOG 148 designed for superior students. (Same as EVRN 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 150 Environment, Culture and Society
An introduction to geographic approaches to the study of the environment, emphasizing societal and cultural factors that influence human interaction with the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere. The course involves analysis of a broad range of contemporary environmental issues from the local to global scales. (Same as EVRN 150.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 351 Africa's Human Geographies
An introduction to historical, cultural, social, political, and economic issues in Africa from a geographic perspective. The course begins with the historical geography of humanity in Africa, from ancient times through to the present. Other topics include cultural dynamics, demography, health, rural development, urbanization, gender issues, and political geography. Case studies from Eastern and Southern Africa will be used to illustrate major themes. (Same as AAAS 351.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Chikanda, Abel
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 28176

GEOG 370 Introduction to Cultural Geography
Charts some of the major lines of research in cultural geography, including critical theory, political economy, poststructuralist thought, feminism, and global consumption. Through fieldwork, diverse research methods are applied to issues such as community development, cultural patterns on the landscape and global impacts on local economies. Prerequisite: GEOG 100, GEOG 101, GEOG 102 or GEOG 103; or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM LIN 317 - LAWRENCE
3 20100

GEOG 371 Environmental Geopolitics
This course examines how human relationships with the biophysical world are politicized. Examines key contributions to debates surrounding environmental security, resource conflicts, and related issues, as well as geopolitical assumptions on which these debates build. (Same as EVRN 371 and GIST 371.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 379 Topics in Cultural Geography: _____
An investigation of special topics in Cultural Geography. May include coursework under headings of culture theory, material culture, language, foodways, or religion. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 396 East Asia
This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics, economy, and culture of Korea, China, and Japan in the context of globalization. In addition to the discussion of individual countries, the course examines the cross-cutting themes such as international relations, cultural exchange, and economic development in the region of East Asia. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 399 Topics in Regional Studies: _____
An investigation of special topics in Regional Studies. May include coursework related to a specific country or region. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 550 Environmental Issues in Africa
Acquaints students with the complexities of debates on environmental problems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Topics addressed may include deforestation, desert expansion, wildlife conservation, soil erosion, climate change, coral reef destruction, water resources development, mangrove preservation, the environmental effects of war, industrialization, and urbanization. Class presentations and projects synthesize the perspectives of both human and physical geography. (Same as AAAS 551.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 552 Topics in Urban/Economic Geography: _____
An investigation of special topics in urban/economic geography. May include specific course work under the headings of energy, economic development, international trade, environmental perception, housing, transportation, and migration. May be repeated. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 553 Geography of African Development
Acquaints students with the values of social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. (Same as AAAS 553.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Chikanda, Abel
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 28184

GEOG 555 Seminar in Urban Geography
This course is a survey of recent literature and conceptual advances within the broad domain of urban geography. It begins by examining a few classic works, and then explores several topics within urban political economy, including the urban division of labor and restructuring, changing modes of urban governance, suburbanization, gentrification, global cities, and gender and the city. It also delves briefly into the issue of urbanization in the developing world. (Same as GIST 555.) Prerequisite: Any upper division course in human geography or urban planning. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 570 Geography of American Indians
A survey of the culture and history of selected indigenous peoples of the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the environmental setting, the settlement and subsistence patterns, and the impact of European colonization. Discussion includes present-day ethnic and resource issues. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 571 Topics in Cultural Geography: _____
An investigation of special topics in cultural geography. May include specific course work under the headings of cultural theory and methodology, material culture, foodways, religion, and similar topics. May be repeated, if topic differs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 590 Understanding Central Asia
An intensive, multidisciplinary survey of Central Asia, focusing on the former Soviet republics-Kazakhstan, Krygystan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan-with additional coverage of neighboring regions (the Caucasus and the Caspian basin, Afghanistan, and western China). The course addresses the history of the region (from the Silk Road to Soviet rule), geography, religion, and the building of post-Soviet states and societies. (Same as REES 510.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Diener, Alexander
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM LIN 228 - LAWRENCE
3 22298

GEOG 591 Geography of Latin America
A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in Latin America which form the basis for the various forms of livelihood. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Herlihy, Peter
TuTh 04:00-05:15 PM LIN 226 - LAWRENCE
3 28363

GEOG 592 Middle American Geography
This regional study of the natural environments and cultural-historical backgrounds of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean details the physical and historical processes that have shaped the cultural landscape. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 597 Geography of Brazil
Study of geographic factors, physical and cultural, that are basic to understanding the historical development of Portuguese South America and the contemporary and cultural geography of Brazil. Course also includes a survey of Brazil's South American neighbors. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 601 Indigenous Peoples of the World
A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GIST 601 and ISP 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GEOG 791 Latin American Regions: _____
A description and analysis of the principal sources of geographic information pertaining to portions or all of Latin America. Prerequisite: GEOG 591 or concurrent auditing of GEOG 591, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERMAN

GERM 100 German Reading Course I
Primarily for graduate students in other departments but also open to seniors planning to pursue graduate study. Fundamentals of grammar and reading texts of medium difficulty. Does not count toward undergraduate language requirement. Previous study of German not necessary. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Morrison, Jimmy
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4019 - LAWRENCE
3 14988

GERM 101 German Reading Course II
Continuation of GERM 100. Advanced grammar and reading advanced texts in the students' respective fields. Does not count toward undergraduate language requirement. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 100 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 104 Elementary German I
Introductory German; no previous German required. Development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts on everyday topics and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 108. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 08:00-08:50 AM WES 1049 - LAWRENCE
5 27980
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 1049 - LAWRENCE
5 23512
LEC Keel, William
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 1049 - LAWRENCE
5 11599
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 1049 - LAWRENCE
5 11600
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 12:00-12:50 PM WES 1049 - LAWRENCE
5 11601
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 1049 - LAWRENCE
5 22384

GERM 108 Elementary German II
Continuation of GERM 104. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts on everyday topics and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 201. Prerequisite: GERM 104 or placement by examination. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 1015 - LAWRENCE
5 11602
LEC Wallace, Emily
MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 1015 - LAWRENCE
5 15168

GERM 111 Introduction to German I
Introduction to German for special purposes; no previous German required. Provides basic familiarity with the German language, focusing on speaking and reading skills and the essentials of German grammar. Introduction to the culture of the German-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by video conference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 112 Introduction to German II
Continuation of GERM 111. Further development of basic familiarity with the German language, focusing on speaking and reading skills and the essentials of German grammar. Continued exploration of the culture of the German-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by video conference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: GERM 111 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 113 Introduction to German III
Continuation of GERM 112. Further development of basic familiarity with the German language, focusing on speaking and reading skills and the essentials of German grammar. Continued exploration of the culture of the German-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by video conference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: GERM 112 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 124 German Cinema in Context
Taught in English. Screening and analysis of German films from the early 20th century to the present. Readings, lectures, and discussions on the films' sources, ideologies, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 125 German Cinema in Context (Honors)
Course content similar to GERM 124. Taught in English. Screening and analysis of German films from the early 20th century to the present. Readings, lectures, and discussions on the films' sources, ideologies, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not count toward German major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 128 Introduction to the Arts in German-Speaking Europe
Taught in English. Exploration of the arts in German-speaking Europe: major cultural periods, movements, art forms, and people (artists, architects, composers, writers, filmmakers) from the Middle Ages to the present. Consideration of the arts within the larger European historical and cultural context from which they emerged. Does not count toward the German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 328. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 130 Today's Challenges in German-Speaking Europe
This course explores significant political, social, and cultural challenges facing German-speaking Europe today. Specific issues may include migration, the environment, national identity, European integration, business, remembering the past, and technology. Focus on Germany, Austria, and Switzerland and to a lesser extent Belgium, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein. Taught in English. Does not count toward the German Studies major or minor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Vanchena, Lorie
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 28000

GERM 132 The City of Berlin in German Culture
Taught in English. Introduction to Berlin within the context of major German and European historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments since 1800. Exploration of complex epochs such as the Bismarck, Nazi, Cold War, and post-unification eras through journalism, literature, sociological writings, and film. Does not count toward German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 332. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 148 Germanic Mythology, Religion, and Folklore
Taught in English. Introduction to the pagan myths and beliefs of Teutonic antiquity and their survival in the popular traditions of Germanic countries, within the framework of comparative mythology, archaeology, and anthropology. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in German. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 201 Intermediate German I
Continuation of GERM 108. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts in different genres and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 202. Prerequisite: GERM 108 or placement by examination. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Wallace, Emily
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4068 - LAWRENCE
3 16926
LEC Wallace, Emily
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4068 - LAWRENCE
3 15864
LEC Wallace, Emily
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM WES 4068 - LAWRENCE
3 11603

GERM 202 Intermediate German II
Continuation of GERM 201. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts in different genres and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who successfully complete this course should take GERM 301. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or placement by examination. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Wallace, Emily
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4019 - LAWRENCE
3 27982
LEC Wallace, Emily
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4019 - LAWRENCE
3 11604

GERM 220 Study Abroad Topics in Germanic Languages and Cultures
This course is for elementary- and intermediate-level instruction in a Germanic language and/or culture while studying abroad. Transfer credits must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad, with permission from the departmental undergraduate advisor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 222 Study Abroad Topics in German Studies: _____
This course is for elementary- and intermediate-level German Studies courses taught in German taken while studying abroad. Transfer credits must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad, with permission from the departmental undergraduate advisor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 301 High Intermediate German I
Continuation of GERM 202. Further development of students' use of German through reading and discussion of literary and non-literary texts (spoken, written, multimedia, combined with intensive grammar review. Introduction to expressive functions of German with emphasis on spoken and written communication. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 302. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or placement by examination. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Linden, Ari
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 1015 - LAWRENCE
3 18267
LEC Meyertholen, Andrea
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM WES 1015 - LAWRENCE
3 19558

GERM 302 High Intermediate German II
Continuation of GERM 301. Refinement and expansion of students' use of German. Reading and discussion in German of literary and non-literary texts (spoken, written, multimedia), combined with continued intensive grammar review. E mphasis on better understanding German grammatical structures and acquisition of vocabulary. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 401. Prerequisite: GERM 301 or placement by examination. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 315 German Literature and the Modern Era
Introduction in English to German writers 1750-present. Discussion of themes such as technology, modern and postmodern developments, gender, war, politics, and culture in German-speaking Europe. Readings include works in translation by influential German writers. Open to first-year students and non-majors. GERM 315 is required for admission to all courses beyond GERM 402 except GERM 462. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Vanchena, Lorie
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM FR 207 - LAWRENCE
3 18418

GERM 320 Border Crossings in German Culture
Taught in English. Exploration of writers, filmmakers, and artists who have emigrated from, or migrated to German-speaking Europe. Emphasis on both their transnational impact and their representations of border crossings. Topics may include exile communities before, during, and after World War II and multiculturalism in contemporary Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Does not count toward German major or minor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Linden, Ari
MW 03:00-04:15 PM WES 1015 - LAWRENCE
3 27998

GERM 324 Magic, Monsters and the Occult in German Literature
Taught in English. Reading and discussion of fictional and non-fictional works by German writers that address topics such as magic, monsters, the occult sciences, the Faust legend and pact with the devil, and the vampire. Consideration of the works' influence on other nations' literatures. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 328 The Arts in German-Speaking Europe
Taught in English. Exploration of the arts in German-speaking Europe: major cultural periods, movements, art forms, and people (artists, architects, composers, writers, filmmakers) from the Middle Ages to the present. Consideration of the arts within the larger European historical and cultural context from which they emerged. Does not count toward the German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 128. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 330 Topics in: _____
Taught in English. Interdisciplinary study of selected aspects of the society or culture of German-speaking Europe or of the European experience. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 332 Berlin in German Culture
Taught in English. Introduction to Berlin within the context of major German and European historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments since 1800. Exploration of complex epochs such as the Bismarck, Nazi, Cold War, and post-unification eras through journalism, literature, sociological writings, and film. Does not count toward German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 132. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 353 German Conversation
Further development of practical conversational skills for students with intermediate proficiency in German. Discussion of topics from everyday German life and current affairs, based on German newspapers and magazines. May be repeated but counts only once toward the major or minor. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 202. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 362 German and Germany in Global Business Culture I
High-intermediate content-based course with focus on the language skills needed to engage actively with the German business world, including applying for internships and jobs. Introduction to common cultural practices in the German business environment. Use of multimedia sources to explore current events and issues in Germany and their significance within a global business context. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or the equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 375 Topics in Film of German-Speaking Europe: _____
Examination of topics such as Expressionism, Turkish-German culture in contemporary German film, popular filmmaking, post-unification film, German literature as film, German film and national identity. Topics and periods vary. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 400 Introduction to German Literary Masterpieces
For students enrolled in the KU Summer Language Institute in Germany. Selected works of major German Language writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 401 Advanced German I
Continuation of GERM 302. Expansion and refinement of proficiency in German (speaking, listening, reading, writing), increased understanding of German grammatical structures, development of a more sophisticated vocabulary, and introduction to stylistics through discussion and analysis of literary and nonliterary texts. Students successfully completing GERM 401 may take all other GERM courses at the 400 and 500 levels. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Vyatkina, Nina
MW 12:30-01:45 PM WES 4019 - LAWRENCE
3 20099

GERM 402 Advanced German II
Continuation of GERM 401. Development of advanced proficiency in German through analysis and discussion of literary and nonliterary texts and practice in advanced composition. Emphasis in both discussions and papers on style and rhetoric and on developing skill in textual analysis. Focus on advanced German grammar and on style and idiomatic expression in spoken and written German. Prerequisite: GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 412 German Culture 1750-Present
Exploration of major cultural periods and movements 1750-present within the framework of historical and political change, with investigation of themes such as nation and national identity, founding myths, geography, and language. Study of forms of culture in German-speaking Europe, including visual art, music, literature, architecture, and the press. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 453 Investigation and Conference: _____
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of German. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Morrison, Jimmy
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 14858
IND Meyertholen, Andrea
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 22529
IND Keel, William
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 11606
IND Linden, Ari
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 18839
IND Vanchena, Lorie
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 16111
IND Vyatkina, Nina
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 15574

GERM 462 German and Germany in Global Business Culture II
Advanced content-based course with focus on the language skills needed to examine the German social market economy, legal forms of companies, and the business planning process. Use of multimedia sources to explore current German business and economic issues in international, transatlantic, and global contexts. Team research project and presentation. Prerequisite: GERM 362 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 482 Literature and Culture of German-Speaking Europe 1830-1918
Exploration of literature within the framework of major cultural movements and historical, political, and economic change. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 483 Literature and Culture of German-Speaking Europe 1918-Present
Exploration of literature within the framework of major cultural movements and historical, political, and economic change. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 501 Advanced German III
Focus on usage-based grammar of contemporary German. Extensive reading and analysis of grammatical structures in context and integration of form, meaning, and use. Exploration of grammatical structures using contemporary electronic textual analysis tools. Prerequisite: GERM 402. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 550 German Language Seminar: History of the German Language
Introduction to basic concepts of German philology and historical linguistics and exploration of the development of a national German language. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 560 German Language Seminar: Structure of the German Language
This course provides an overview of the structure of modern standard German. Students will explore different levels of the linguistic system of German (including phonology, morphology, and syntax) and complete practical exercises. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 575 Topics in Genre: _____
Study of the definition, style, form, and content of a specific literary genre in German-language literature and the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that led to its emergence. Consideration of the genre's suitability for particular writers or periods. Topic and period vary. May be repeated if content varies. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 579 Investigation and Conference: _____
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work required. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 598 Research for Departmental Honors
Research for a departmental honors project, on a topic chosen in conjunction with the faculty advisor. Emphasis on independent study and writing. Open to students with previous coursework in German at the 400 level, an overall 3.0 GPA, and at least a B+ average in advanced work in German. Prerequisite: GERM 315, GERM 401, senior standing, and permission of Undergraduate Advisor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 616 Topics in German Literature: _____
Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works on a particular topic or theme (e.g., nature, women, art and literature, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 618 Topics in German Language and Linguistics: _____
Readings and discussions in German in an area of specialized language or linguistic study (e.g., lexical fields, modern German dialects, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 620 Topics in German Culture and Folklore:_____
Readings and discussions in German on some aspect of German culture or folklore, including Landeskunde (study of contemporary Germany). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 626 Idiomatic Usage in Modern Colloquial and Literary German
Practical exercises in the systematic study of idioms and synonyms, designed to foster a more discriminating and effective usage of German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 630 Advanced German Grammar
Recommended for students intending to teach German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 701 Introduction to the Study of Literature
Introduction to methods of literary research and presentation of seminar papers. Exercises in the use of basic guides to the study of German language and literature, in the documentation of scholarly research, and in the writing of interpretive essays, based on reading and discussion of selected works from different periods of the departmental "Basic Reading List. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 712 The Structure of Modern Standard German
A comprehensive introduction to the structure and usage of contemporary German, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, text linguistics, semantics, pragmatics, and language variation. Students will listen to lectures, read texts on German linguistics, participate in discussions, and work extensively on linguistic problems involving German. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 716 Topics in German Literature: _____
Intensive study of a selected topic in German literature. May be repeated. Offered only in conjunction with GERM 616 when taught by a Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor. Graduate students will be assigned additional work. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GERM 721 Introduction to Middle High German Literature
The elements of Middle High German as required for reading medieval texts in the original. Intensive reading and literary study of at least one text in full. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GLOBAL & INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

GIST 201 Topics in: _____
An interdisciplinary study of international topics. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 202 Topics in South Asian Studies: _____
An interdisciplinary study of topics related to South Asia. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 203 Topics in Middle Eastern Studies: _____
An interdisciplinary study of topics related to the Middle East. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 215 A Global History of Money: Aristotle to Bitcoin
What is money? What does it enable, and why do we value it? Is money always the same thing? What are the relationships between money and wealth? Through examining how people across the world and over time used money and answered these questions, this course is an introduction to the global history of money in its myriad forms: gold coins, silver ingots, bonds, debts, cowry shells, and bricks of tea. It approaches money as a point of entry into themes in political, cultural, intellectual, and social history. As such, it is not a course in economic or business history, but a historical examination of how money has transformed our world. We read and view a wide range of secondary and primary sources, ranging from images of money itself to recent works by anthropologists, historians, and economists. (Same as HIST 215.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 250 Introduction to Globalization
Along with an overview of the origins and historical development of globalization, the course addresses various aspects of the growth of transnational economic, cultural, institutional, and political interconnections, including the implications of rapidly-developing information technology and social media, international security in a transnational world, and the issues related to the movement of goods, people (immigration), images, ideas, and institutional forms across national borders. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 305 World Indigenous Literatures
A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305 and ISP 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 308 Key Themes in Modern Global History
A comparative historical analysis of major global developments from the late 15th century to the present. Some of the themes likely to be explored are empire-building, contact between cultures and colonial social relations; the attraction of cities, their role in a global economy and the shift to an urban world; and the impact of capitalism and industrialization on social organization including conflict between classes and changes in the nature of work. Students learn ways of interpreting primary historical documents and comparing historical investigations across time and space. (Same as HIST 308.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 314 Globalization: History and Theory
Explores the rise of global capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, contemporary debates about 21st century globalization, and the role of globalization in our everyday lives. Questions considered include: Is globalization an incremental process that has been going on for centuries, or it is a dramatic new force reshaping the post-Cold War world? Is it a cultural and social process or an economic and political one? Or is it all of these things? Not open to students who have completed HIST 315. (Same as HIST 314.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 320 Love, Sex and Marriage in India
This course addresses diverse aspects of the philosophies and expressions of intimacy and pleasure as found in India. Using old and new literature, including from the Kamasutra, as well as media, we examine the following: how and why in ancient times sensual pleasure was another path for ultimate bliss; how perspectives and traditions of intimacy have changed over time; diverse types of marriages; the culture and practice of arranged marriages; same-sex intimacy; and universal concepts of love. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 325 Peoples and Cultures of South Asia
This course provides an introduction to the diversity of peoples in South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan. The particular cultures and language of the indigenous peoples in the region are highlighted through academic sources and the direct study of reproductions of these cultures in literature and film. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 350 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in global and international studies at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in Global and International Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 424 Nationalism(s) in Turkey
This course analyzes the major variations in nationalist paradigms existing in contemporary Turkey, including conservative nationalism, secular nationalism, religious (Islamic) nationalism, and Kurdish nationalism. Through the lens of seminal theories on the origins, development, and types of nationalism and the relevant historical background of the Turkish Republic, we explore how these competing visions of "the nation" and "homeland" have changed, fragmented, and manifested themselves in everyday Turkish politics and society. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 493 Directed Readings
Individual and supervised readings in a selected area of international studies. Course is repeatable with permission of the program director. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 501 Topics in: _____
An interdisciplinary study of international topics. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC De Andrade Tosta, Antonio
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 2600 - LAWRENCE
3 29009

GIST 502 Advanced Topics in South Asian Studies: _____
An interdisciplinary study of topics related to South Asia. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite depends on specific topic offered. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 503 Advanced Topics in Middle East Studies: _____
An interdisciplinary study of topics related to the Middle East. May be repeated for credit if content e depends on specific topic offered. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zeedan, Rami
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM FR 221 - LAWRENCE
3 28755
LEC Zeedan, Rami
M 02:30-05:00 PM WES 4035 - LAWRENCE
3 28756

GIST 530 Politics and Society in the Contemporary Persianate World
This course examines the major currents of political developments and their linkages with religion, culture and civil society in Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India since the late nineteenth century. During the "pre-modern" period, all these countries formed part of "the Persianate world," a region that extended from the Iranian plateau to the Balkans, Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent, mostly under the Turkic administrations, and tied together by trade, Islam, and Persian as the lingua franca. The dissemination of modern Western political thought and nationalism during the colonial period led to nation-states and the end of the linguistic domination of Persian in the region. Though each of these nation-states ultimately took a different trajectory, they each were faced with similar challenges that offer the basis for interesting comparisons between them. This course explores the trajectories of these countries in regard to the relations between the state, religion, and politics, various strands of nationalism, pluralism, religious and ethnic minorities, social equality, and democratization. Prerequisite: GIST 301 or POLS 150. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 535 Literature and Society in the Contemporary Middle East
This course offers a general introduction to the modern Middle Eastern literatures in English translation. Through analyses of selected short stories and novels from Arabic, Turkish and Persian literature, the students develop an understanding of the issues that shape everyday life in the Contemporary Middle East. The course investigates issues of nation and national identity, war, ethnicity, class, religion, and gender and sexuality. We use a variety of paradigms, namely nationalist, Marxist, feminist, and Islamist, to provide a theoretical framework for discussion of the selected works. No prior knowledge of Arabic, Turkish or Persian language is needed. Prerequisite: GIST 301. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 550 Issues in Global Studies: _____
An interdisciplinary study of topics with particular emphasis on issues of global importance--i.e. transnational and trans-regional. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite: GIST 301. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Quiason, Marcy
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM BL 212 - LAWRENCE
3 28371

GIST 633 Iran, Turkey, and the Kurds
This course examines the contemporary political and social dynamics within these three communities residing along the northern stretch of what is commonly referred to as the Middle East. Using social and political theory as a starting point, students will comparatively study critical elements and issues facing the members of these societies. Issues and themes for comparison will include the structure and institutions of politics, nation-building and nationalism, Islam and politics, women and politics, and regional and global engagement. Prerequisite: GIST 301, POLS 150, or SOC 130. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 570 Anthropology of Violence
Introduces students to the comparative and cross-cultural study of violence. The course begins by surveying different anthropological approaches to the study of violence, with special attention paid to classical social theorists as well as ethnographic works. Topics may include (post) coloniality and identity politics, nationalism, race, religion, and political culture; geographic areas to be covered may include Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and South Asia. (Same as ANTH 570.) Prerequisite: Junior standing or above or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 610 Interdisciplinary Methods for Global Contexts
An introduction to a variety of widely-employed quantitative and qualitative research methods in the social sciences and humanities, including methods such as statistical analysis, ethnography, and content analysis. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Lagotte, Brian
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM JRP 147 - LAWRENCE
3 28794
LEC Lagotte, Brian
MW 03:00-04:15 PM BA 103 - LAWRENCE
3 28799

GIST 624 Social Movements in the Middle East
Using the major theories and approaches comparatively applied to social movements around the world, this course critically analyzes historical and existing cases of social movements and "nonmovements" in the Middle East. We cover examples of Islamist (and post-Islamist), women's, nationalist, democratic, youth and labor movements and their impact on the region. Contextual factors like technology and social networking, regime type, institutions, and socioeconomic structures are also considered for their role in supporting or inhibiting collective action. Prerequisite: GIST 301 or POLS 150. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 667 Islam and Politics
This course gives students a basic understanding of Islam and Islamic movements, explores the economic, social, political, and cultural context in which these movements take place, and examines the impact of Islam on politics in select countries. Issues such as compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics, political economy in Muslim societies, fundamentalism in Islam, gender relations, identity politics and questions on clash of civilizations are explored. (Same as POLS 667 and SOC 640.) Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology, POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 678 Chinese Foreign Policy
In-depth examination of China's changing policies toward other countries with special emphasis on policy-making process, negotiating behavior, military strategy, economic relations, and cultural diplomacy. (Same as EALC 678 and POLS 678.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 684 International Law: The State and the Individual
International law has assumed an increasingly significant role in international life. This course examines major issues in international law including (but not limited to): the changing status and role of the state; rights of minorities and self-determination; the environment; and human rights. The course examines the central questions and the relevant international legal principles associated with each issue. Prerequisite: POLS 170. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 685 International Law: Laws of Armed Conflict
This course examines the principles, roles, and functions of international law in the conduct of war. As the course reviews the development and application of the basic rules of armed conflict, several current issues and conflicts are addressed including: the legitimate use of force; the proper definitions of combatants and civilians; actions that constitute war crimes, the legality of new weapons technology, and, if the laws of armed conflict apply to the current "war on terrorism." Prerequisite: POLS 170. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 701 Approaches to International Studies
This course examines various approaches to the study of cultures, politics, and societies in their global and international contexts through the exploration of a series of exemplary works of global/international research from a variety of disciplines (eg. anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, geography, history, etc.). The course will cover the major contributions of these disciplines in their approaches to global questions and themes and will provide a multi-disciplinary framework within which students can begin exploring their own global and international research questions. The course also provides an introduction to the major regions and many of the themes that students will be able to specialize in during the course of the MA program. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Wuthrich, Mike
Tu 06:15-09:00 PM BA 301 - LAWRENCE
3 22482

GIST 702 Globalization
A central issue in international studies is globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of societies and economies. This course examines globalization from an historical and contemporary perspective. Major topics include (but are not necessarily limited to) the historical expansion of the West since 1500, the growth of international economic institutions, conflict among global cultures, the future of state sovereignty, and the challenges of economic integration. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hanley, Eric
Tu 04:00-08:00 PM KS-ST FTLV - OFF CAMPUS
3 24998

GIST 703 The World Economy
An introduction to international trade and finance, theories of economic development, and international economic structures. Not appropriate for economics majors. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 704 Global Cultures and Societies
Examination of the components of culture, economic and political anthropology, major global cultural areas, and the impact of cultural differences as expressed through language, literature, religion, thought, and motivation in cross-cultural communications. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 705 Globalization in History
A study of the increasing interaction among world societies since 1500 and an investigation of the long-term developments behind current world problems. Major topics include Western expansion since 1500, the spread of state sovereignty, the formation of a world economy, and the spread of international institutions. Current issues will vary, but may include environmental crises, human rights, migration, free trade and the spread of consumer culture, ethnicity and nationalism, and international intervention within states. (Same as HIST 705.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 706 Comparative Governments
Survey of different governmental structures in the contemporary world and the ways these countries have confronted issues such as modernization and development, economic security, ethnic pluralism and conflict, and globalization. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 710 Research Design for International Area Studies
This course addresses the challenges for students engaged in graduate research projects and theses in an interdisciplinary and international context. Therefore, students taking this course must be prepared to plan toward a future graduate research project. The course will guide the students through the structures of research design processes for various epistemological approaches, and will assist students in formulating strong research questions, reviewing and situating their own work within the literature, working with the library and subject librarians, appropriating theory, and modeling writing conventions for research within their selected epistemological community. Students will also be exposed to a variety of research methods and will practice designing projects utilizing a select number of these. (Same as CEAS 710.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

GIST 750 Topics in International Studies: _____
A study of one or more selected topics in international studies. Course may be taken more than once. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC De Andrade Tosta, Antonio
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 2600 - LAWRENCE
3 29022
LEC Bhala, Raj
MTuTh 04:00-07:30 PM KS-ST FTLV - OFF CAMPUS
MTh 04:00-07:30 PM KS-ST FTLV - OFF CAMPUS
MTh 04:00-07:30 PM KS-ST FTLV - OFF CAMPUS
Tu 04:00-07:30 PM KS-ST FTLV - OFF CAMPUS
3 23025

HAITIAN

HAIT 110 Elementary Haitian I
Beginning course in the vernacular language of Haiti, Martinique, Guadeloupe and other areas of the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean. Conversational approach, with essentials of grammar. Reading of basic texts. Special attention to folk culture as expressed by language. No previous knowledge of another foreign language is required. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Laguerre, Jowel
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 15296

HAIT 120 Elementary Haitian II
Continuation of HAIT 110, with further readings in Haitian literature. Prerequisite: HAIT 110 or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Haitian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 230 Intermediate Haitian I
Continued practice in conversation and composition; intensive and extensive readings from contemporary press, short story, poetry, and folk tales. Prerequisite: HAIT 120 or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 240 Intermediate Haitian II
Continuation of HAIT 230, with additional readings from theatre, novel, and historical texts. Prerequisite: HAIT 230 or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 300 Contemporary Haiti
Detailed analysis of recent Haitian history. The focus will include interactions between religion, social structure, politics, economics and international relations. (Same as AAAS 302.) Prerequisite: AAAS 301/HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 350 Advanced Haitian I
Course objective is a sophisticated command of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Haitian. Texts include newspapers and other Haitian publications as well as spoken material produced essentially for native speakers. Conversation and oral presentations. Keeping of personal journal in Haitian. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 360 Advanced Haitian II
Continuation of HAIT 350, plus advanced readings from Haitian authors such as Carrie Paultre, Frank Etienne, Lyonel Desmarattes, and Michel-Rolph Trouillot. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 500 Directed Studies in Haitian Language and Literature
Advanced work in either language or literature or both. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Conferences. As a three-credit-hour course, it may count toward a major in African and African-American studies. Prerequisite: Four semesters of Haitian Creole or equivalent and consent of instructor. IND.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAIT 501 Directed Studies in Haitian Culture
Advanced work in Haitian culture. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Conferences. As a three-credit-hour course, it may count toward a major in African and African-American studies. No knowledge of Haitian or French is required. Prerequisite: AAAS 301 or HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Accilien, Cecile
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-15 16855

HAIT 700 Investigation and Conference
Supervised individual readings in selected areas of Haitian language, literature, and culture. Individual reports and conferences. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HAUSA

HAUS 110 Elementary Hausa I
Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Hausa. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 120 Elementary Hausa II
Five hours of class per week. A continuation of HAUS 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: HAUS 110. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hausa. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 210 Intermediate Hausa I
Three hours of class conducted in Hausa. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Hausa texts and discussion in Hausa. Prerequisite: HAUS 120. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 220 Intermediate Hausa II
Three hours of class conducted in Hausa. Continuation of HAUS 210. Discussion in Hausa of texts studied. Prerequisite: HAUS 210. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 310 Advanced Hausa I
A practical Hausa language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Hausa. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Hausa study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: HAUS 220 or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 320 Advanced Hausa II
A continuation of HAUS 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of HAUS 310 or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 401 Readings in Hausa I
Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentation, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908
HAUS 402 Readings in Hausa II
Continuation of HAUS 401. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zey, Brent
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SNOW 358 - LAWRENCE
3 27908

HEBREW

HEBR 110 Elementary Israeli Hebrew I
A beginning course in modern Israeli Hebrew. Essentials of grammar, syntax and conversational practice; elementary reading and writing. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rissien, Shelley
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4022 - LAWRENCE
5 11705

HEBR 120 Elementary Israeli Hebrew II
A continuation of HEBR 110. Note Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 110. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hebrew. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 210 Intermediate Israeli Hebrew I
Further development of language skills: listening comprehension, oral efficiency, intermediate grammar and syntax, reading and writing. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 120. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rissien, Shelley
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 1015 - LAWRENCE
3 15598

HEBR 220 Intermediate Israeli Hebrew II
A continuation of HEBR 210. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 210. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 230 Biblical Hebrew
This course introduces students to the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew. It includes basic biblical passages for students to translate into English and analyze. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 240 Biblical Hebrew II
This is a continuation of Hebrew 230. It continues the study of the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, and includes biblical texts for students to translate and analyze. Prerequisite: HEBR 230 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 340 Advanced Israeli Hebrew I
Advanced study of Modern Hebrew. This course is designed to strengthen linguistic skills, enrich vocabulary, and further the study of grammar and syntax. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or permission of the instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rissien, Shelley
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM ST 334A - LAWRENCE
3 16764

HEBR 350 Advanced Israeli Hebrew II
Continued advanced study of modern Hebrew. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 340 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 395 Study Abroad Topics in Hebrew: _____
This course is designed for the study abroad of special topics in Hebrew at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HEBR 410 Studies in Modern Hebrew Literature
An introduction to Hebrew literature from the nineteenth century to the present day. The course emphasizes the development of basic interpretive skills and the understanding of basic literary movements, genres, and concepts. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rissien, Shelley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 21791

HEBR 490 Independent Study
Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Rissien, Shelley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 18792

HINDI

HNDI 110 Beginning Hindi I
An introduction to modern standard Hindi that emphasizes acquisition of basic language skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing) through a combination of lecture, drill, and work with the Devanagari script. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sabarwal, Patricia
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM LEA 1131 - LAWRENCE
TuTh 01:00-01:50 PM ROB 159 - LAWRENCE
5 16653

HNDI 120 Beginning Hindi II
A continuation of Beginning Hindi I that builds on basic skills of speaking and comprehension, and the writing and reading of the Devanagari script developed in Beginning Hindi I. Prerequisite: HNDI 110 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Beginning Hindi II. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HNDI 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hungarian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HNDI 210 Intermediate Hindi I
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar. Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 120 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi I. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sabarwal, Patricia
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM LIN 401 - LAWRENCE
3 16654

HNDI 220 Intermediate Hindi II
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension,reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar. Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 210 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi II. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HNDI 301 Topics in Hindi Culture, Language and Literature: _____
Investigation of special topics on Hindi culture, language and literature at the undergraduate level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HNDI 301 Topics in Hindi Culture, Language and Literature: _____
Investigation of special topics on Hindi culture, language and literature at the undergraduate level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HNDI 310 Advanced Hindi I
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi. Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi I. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sabarwal, Patricia
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM BA 103 - LAWRENCE
3 17356

HNDI 320 Advanced Hindi II
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi. Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 310 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi II. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HNDI 593 Directed Study in Hindi Culture and Literature: _____
This course is designed for students seeking proficiency in Hindi beyond HNDI 320. Instructor will direct the student through readings and materials in Hindi that will add to the students substantive knowledge of India and culture in the Hindi language. May be taken multiple semesters for credit with varying content. Prerequisite: HNDI 320, and consent of instructor. LAB.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LAB Sabarwal, Patricia
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 20810
LAB Sabarwal, Patricia
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 20846

HISTORY

HIST 104 Introduction to African History
An introduction to important historical developments in Africa. Topics include empires, kingdoms, the slave trade, European colonialism, liberation movements, national identities, and a return to independence. (Same as AAAS 105.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Omwodo, Hannington
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 21320

HIST 109 The Black Experience in the Americas
An interdisciplinary study of the history of the African peoples of the New World, relating their cultures and institutions to the African background and to their peculiar New World experiences up to and including the nineteenth century. While the main emphasis is on the U.S.A., attention is also paid to the Caribbean and Latin America. Approaches include demography, economics, social and political developments, literature, and music. (Same as AAAS 106.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Alexander, Shawn
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM MAL 1001 - LAWRENCE
3 22061

HIST 111 Introduction to African History, Honors
An intensive version of AAAS 105/HIST 104. An introduction to important historical developments in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara. Topics include early history, empires, kingdoms and city-states, the slave trade, southern Africa, partition and colonialism, the independence era, military and civilian governments, and liberation movements. Approaches include literature, the visual arts, politics, economics, and geography. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as AAAS 115.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 112 Introduction to British History
This course will introduce students to the concepts, issues, and methods of historical study, at the same time as it explores the main processes and events which shaped the history of Britain and its imperial dependencies. Students will be introduced to the nature and validity of different historical interpretations, and to the purpose and merit of historical writings. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 115 French Revolution to the Present: Europe 1789-Present
An introduction to recent European history, with emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to create the Europe of today: the French Revolution, the romantic movement, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism, imperialism, Communism, and two World Wars, the cold war, and its aftermath. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 116 French Revolution to the Present: Europe 1789 to Present, Honors
An introduction to recent European history, with emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to create the Europe of today: The French Revolution, the romantic movement, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism, imperialism, Communism, and two World Wars, the cold war and its aftermath. Not open to students who have taken HIST 115. This Honors course is a Humanities Historical Studies Principal Course. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 117 Russia, An Introduction
This course introduces students to the history of Russia from its beginnings to the present. It explores Russia's ethnic and religious diversity, the relationship between the state and its peoples, the geopolitics of its place between Europe and Asia, and the revolutionary movements that shook Russia and shaped the world around it. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 118 History of East Asia
A survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and other cultures in East Asia from premodern to modern times. Students are introduced to the major currents of East Asian history and historical methods used to study them. Not open to students with credit in upper division East Asian history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 119 History of East Asia, Honors
A survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and other cultures in East Asia from premodern to modern times. Students are introduced to the major currents of East Asian history and historical methods used to study them. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 120 Colonial Latin America
The principal focus is on the evolution and analysis of societies, economies, and religions of native American peoples, the impact of Spanish and Portuguese conquests and settlement, government, trade and culture upon native civilizations, the influence of African population and culture, and the creole nature of the resulting society in the colonial period. Changes in the society and economy which presaged the movements for independence are also discussed. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 121 Modern Latin America
Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform or revolution in the 20th Century. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. In this way the course deals with interpretations of the processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Cushman, Gregory
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 28007

HIST 123 Modern Latin America, Honors
Similar in content to HIST 121. Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform and revolution in the 20th century. In this way the course deals with interpretations of these processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 124 Latin American Culture and Society
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with the basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as LAA 100.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Herlihy, Laura
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 1009 - LAWRENCE
3 28992
LEC Herlihy, Laura
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 24316

HIST 124 Latin American Culture and Society
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with the basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as LAA 100.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Herlihy, Laura
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 1009 - LAWRENCE
3 28992
LEC Herlihy, Laura
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 24316

HIST 140 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change
This interdisciplinary course and laboratory sections survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 140 and GEOG 140.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM RIT 164 - LAWRENCE
5 17271
LBN
W 09:00-10:50 AM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18563
LBN
W 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18565
LBN
Th 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18566
LBN
F 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18564

HIST 144 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change, Honors
This interdisciplinary course surveys the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as GEOG 144 and EVRN 144.) Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM RIT 164 - LAWRENCE
5 18554
LBN Brox, Ali
Loecke, Terrance
Tu 11:00-12:50 PM LIN 307 - LAWRENCE
5 18540

HIST 160 Introduction to West African History
This course treats West African history through the first part of the twentieth century. The student is provided with a perspective on the major historical patterns that gave rise to West Africa's development as an integral part of world history. Special attention is paid to anthropological, geographical, and technological developments that influenced West African political and socioeconomic changes. (Same as AAAS 160.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Omwodo, Hannington
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 28008

HIST 190 Warlords and Rebels in Asia
Warlords tear apart society and try to rebuild it according to their own terms. Rebels challenge the status quo. This course provides an introduction to East Asian political, social, and cultural history through a thematic lens. The class offers students a diverse variety of perspectives on social and political change in East Asia and encourages them to reflect on such themes in Western contexts as well. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 191 Dawn of Japan
Where did the Japanese come from? What connects Japan to other civilizations in Asia? How did people in Japan in the ancient period live and try to understand their place in the universe? What role did women play as rulers and arbiters of culture? This introductory course traces the origins of Japanese civilization from prehistoric times to the twelfth century introducing key political, social, and cultural developments including the arrival of Buddhism, the development of the first cities, and the rise of the imperial court. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 250 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in History at the freshman/sophomore level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 300 Modern Africa
A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles. Themes may include resistance, liberation, nationalism, gender issues, agriculture, genocide, and human rights. (Same as AAAS 305.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Omwodo, Hannington
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SUM 506 - LAWRENCE
3 28019

HIST 303 Sin Cities
This course offers a comparative global introduction to the history of the modern city by looking at the ways in which certain metropoli developed an attractive underbelly of decadence at the same time as they sought to be centers of refined and orderly cosmopolitan life. The course examines topics such as popular culture, gambling, prostitution, crime, violence, nightlife, tourism, and corruption in the context of the increased social mobility that characterized the beginning of the industrial age and that has extended into the 21st century. Students investigate the changing relation between work and leisure, spectacle and consumerism, and urban space and the struggle for order. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rosenthal, Anton
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 28016

HIST 307 Modern Africa, Honors
An intensive version of HIST 300. A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles. Themes may include resistance, liberation, nationalism, gender issues, agriculture, genocide, and human rights. (Same as AAAS 307.) Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 308 Key Themes in Modern Global History
A comparative historical analysis of major global developments from the late 15th century to the present. Some of the themes likely to be explored are empire-building, contact between cultures and colonial social relations; the attraction of cities, their role in a global economy and the shift to an urban world; and the impact of capitalism and industrialization on social organization including conflict between classes and changes in the nature of work. Students learn ways of interpreting primary historical documents and comparing historical investigations across time and space. (Same as GIST 308.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 314 Globalization: History and Theory
Explores the rise of global capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, contemporary debates about 21st century globalization, and the role of globalization in our everyday lives. Questions considered include: Is globalization an incremental process that has been going on for centuries, or it is a dramatic new force reshaping the post-Cold War world? Is it a cultural and social process or an economic and political one? Or is it all of these things? Not open to students who have completed HIST 315. (Same as GIST 314.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 326 Native American Civilizations and their European Conquerors
The societies, economies, and cultures of Native American peoples in Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and the Southwestern United States will provide the main focus of this course to understand the culture and values of those who preceded the Europeans in the Americas. European culture is also examined, including the motivations for exploration and conquest. The details of the particular conquests and how they affected the resulting composite society will also be discussed, using contemporary eye-witness accounts, films recreating the action, and modern accounts. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 328 The Modern Middle East
A survey of the history of the Middle East from 1800 to the present. Lectures and discussions focus on diversity within the Middle East over two centuries of major political and cultural change. Topics include causes for the decline of the Ottoman Empire, debates over modernization, European imperialism and the formation of nation-states, twentieth century cultural revolutions and women's activism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the revival of Islamic social movements. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brown, Marie
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM JRP 150 - LAWRENCE
3 28015

HIST 339 Screening Germany: The Tumultuous Twentieth Century through Film
This course traces the history of twentieth-century Germany through the medium of film. We will view a wide array of films, from turn-of-the-century silent films and Nazi propaganda to Cold War-era East German entertainments and recent depictions of the German past. We will view films critically and develop the tools and vocabulary to analyze them as historical sources. We will also contextualize the films through a wide range of primary and secondary source readings, demonstrating how film served as a tool of political power, social criticism, and national identification in Germany's tumultuous twentieth century. (Same as EURS 339.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 340 The History of the Second World War
A survey of the origins, course, and consequences of the war, 1930-1945. Political, economic, military, and social aspects will be dealt with in the context of their global effects. Extensive use will be made of motion pictures and other media. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Lewis, Adrian
MW 10:00-10:50 AM MAL 2048 - LAWRENCE
3 17770
DIS Lewis, Adrian
F 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4034 - LAWRENCE
3 23543
DIS Lewis, Adrian
F 10:00-10:50 AM CDS1 1144 - LAWRENCE
3 17782
DIS Lewis, Adrian
F 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4022 - LAWRENCE
3 20719
DIS Lewis, Adrian
F 11:00-11:50 AM WES 1017 - LAWRENCE
3 17773

HIST 341 Hitler and Nazi Germany
An examination of the rise of Hitler and Nazism, beginning with the breakdown of 19th century culture in the First World War and continuing through the failure of democracy under the Weimar Republic. The course will also discuss the impact of Nazism on Germany and how Nazism led to the Second World War and the Holocaust. (Same as JWSH 341.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Denning, Andrew
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 28020
LEC Sternberg, Frances
W 06:00-08:30 PM REGN 163 - EDWARDS
3 21129

HIST 342 Medieval to Early Modern Jewish History
This course surveys the political, economic, social, and cultural experience of Jews in the medieval and early modern periods, from the sixth through the seventeenth centuries. It examines Jewish life in the Mediterranean diaspora, the Iberian Peninsula, and Christian Europe and considers the impact of Jewish communities on the non-Jewish host societies in which they settled. (Same as JWSH 342.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 343 The Holocaust in History
The systematic murder of the Jews of Europe by the Nazis during World War II is one of the most important events of modern history. This course studies the Holocaust by asking about its place in history. It compares other attempted genocides with the Holocaust and examines why most historians argue that it is unique. Other topics covered include the reasons the Holocaust occurred in Europe when it did, the changing role of anti-Semitism, and the effects of the Holocaust on civilization. The course also discusses why some people have sought to deny the Holocaust. The course concludes by discussing the questions people have raised about the Holocaust and such issues as support for democracy, the belief in progress, the role of science, and the search for human values which are common to all societies. (Same as JWSH 343.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 350 The Korean War, 1950-1953
An examination of the origins, pattern of development, and legacy of this still unsettled conflict, which in many ways set the tone for the entire post-1945 era of the Cold War. Points of emphasis will include the motives and policies of the major participants (Koreans, Americans, Chinese, and Soviets), as well as the effects of the war on their domestic politics and foreign policy positions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 351 American Indian and White Relations to 1865
This course provides an intensive survey of the Indians of North America from Prehistory to 1865, and focuses on ancient indigenous cultures, early European-Indian relations and the impact of European culture upon the indigenous peoples of North America. (Same as HUM 348, ISP 348.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Mihesuah, Devon
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 29007

HIST 352 American Indians Since 1865
This course examines American Indian/White relations from reconstruction to the present. It surveys the impact of westward expansion and cultural changes brought about by the Civil War, forced education, intermarriage, the Dawes Act, the New Deal, the World Wars, termination, relocation and stereotypical literature and movies. The class also addresses the Red Power and AIM movements, as well as indigenous efforts to decolonize and to recover and retain indigenous knowledge. After learning about the past from both Native and non-Native source materials, students will gain multiple perspectives about historical events and gain understandings of diverse world views, values, and responses to adversity. (Same as HUM 350 and ISP 350.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 353 Indigenous Peoples of North America
This course surveys the history of the first peoples to inhabit North America from prehistory to present. Commonly and collectively referred to as American Indians, indigenous peoples include a diverse array of nations, chiefdoms, confederacies, tribes, and bands, each of which has its own unique cultures, economies, and experiences in dealing with colonial and neocolonial powers. This class seeks to demonstrate this diversity while at the same time providing an understanding of the common struggle for political and cultural sovereignty that all indigenous nations face. Indigenous nations that have developed a relationship with the United States will receive primary focus, but comparative reference will be made to First Nations of Canada. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 365 Invention of the Tropics
This course surveys the history of the tropical environment and its peoples from Europe's first encounter to today's ecotourism boom. It focuses on portrayals of the tropics in historical travel accounts and films. Through these sources, we seek to understand how science, technology, and tourism have been used, in turn, as instruments of progress and destruction, tools of empire and national liberation. Case studies are drawn from Latin America, Africa, Oceania, and Asia. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 368 A History of Afro-Latin America
This course examines the history of Africans and their descendants in Latin America. In this region, Africans could be found serving as militia commanders, laboring as skilled tradesmen, running their own businesses, working as household servants, and toiling on plantations. Students will study the varied experiences of these men and women across colonial and national boundaries. Topics include: acculturation/ Creolization, manumission, family formation, social networks, economic roles, political mobilization, and interaction with indigenous peoples. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 369 Colonialism and Revolution in the Third World, Honors
This course will study the structure and dynamics of colonialism and neo-colonialism in the third world beginning in the 19th Century and continuing to the 1980s. It will also examine responses to these systems, from small-scale resistance to nationalist revolutions. Attention will be given to the relationship between ideology and collective behavior. Case studies will be drawn from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 370 Violence and Conflict in Latin American History
This course treats the history of Latin America since the European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. It traces the roots of the region's social collapse during the twentieth century to political and cultural factors in the colonial and early national periods. Using films and literature in addition to historical texts, the course discusses the sources of nationalism, civil wars, banditry, urbanization, violent dissent, military dictatorships, human rights abuses and guerrilla insurgencies as well as the political uses of violence made by different social groups. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 371 Tequila, Tango, Carnival, City
This course explores the history of modern urban Latin America through the lens of popular culture. Elements of culture that will be examined include music, food, soccer, cinema, photography, and art of the 19th and 20th centuries. Some of the themes likely to be explored are collective identity, exile, travel, cultural resistance to state violence, public rituals, and the evolution of the city and its cultural spaces. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 372 Violence and Conflict in Latin American History, Honors
This course treats the history of Latin America since the European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. It traces the roots of the region's social collapse during the 20th century to political and cultural factors in the colonial and early national periods. Using films and literature in addition to historical texts, the course discusses the sources of nationalism, civil wars, banditry, urbanization, violent dissent, military dictatorships, human rights abuses, and guerrilla insurgencies as well as the political uses of violence made by different social groups. Not open to students who have taken HIST 370. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 378 Beyond the Iron Curtain: Soviet Perspectives on the Cold War
This course reimagines the Cold War through Soviet eyes, challenging assumptions and offering less familiar perspectives on a global conflict. Analyzing Soviet and American mass media, popular culture, declassified documents, and personal stories, students investigate the following: Who started the Cold War, and who won it? Was it a time of relative peace or paranoia? How did the two sides view each other and did espionage help them know each other better? How did people and culture sometimes cross the iron curtain? What were the Soviets doing in places like Latin America and the Middle East? And why were both sides so concerned with Olympic athletes, ballet defectors, and cosmonauts? LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 379 Europe in Crisis: Empire, Extremism, and War, 1890-1945
This course examines the sense of crisis that defined European life in the first half of the twentieth century, an era defined by economic spasms, cultural revolts, extreme political ideologies, and two massively destructive world wars. We will examine the period between 1890 and 1945 as a violent, at times apocalyptic, clash between three competing ideologies - communism, fascism, and liberal democracy -demonstrating how extremism both fed upon and created a sense of crisis. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 385 Themes in British History
For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program. This course examines some of the main events and trends in British history, from the earliest times to recent British history. The specific historical themes investigated will depend upon the instructor. The course can be taken only via enrollment in the KU British Summer Institute in the Humanities. Prerequisite: Approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 390 Topics in Non-Western History: _____
A study of a specialized theme or topic in non-Western History. Students will examine major issues and methods of historical study through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. This course grants HIST Category II credit. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zeedan, Rami
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM FR 221 - LAWRENCE
3 28805
LEC Stiller, Maya
MW 09:30-10:45 AM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 29014
LEC Cushman, Gregory
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 28682
LEC
M 06:00-07:15 PM ONLNE ZOOM - LAWRENCE
3 29018

HIST 392 Huns, Turks, and Mongols: The Nomad Factor in Asian History
This course introduces the history of major nomadic powers in Eurasian Steppe and their impact in the world from the first Millennium BCE to around 1500 AD. The main topics include the culture of the Scythians, the Hun and Xiongnu confederacy, the Mongol conquest, and the Turkish empires in Central and West Asia. It investigates the natural and human forces that shape the identities of the nomads and their changing images in history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 394 Made in China: Chinese Business History
This course examines the development of business culture in China since 1900. Looking particularly at how it has transformed and adapted in response to China's own changing political environment as well as China's changing engagement with the West and Japan. We examine cases of western businesses in China and Chinese businesses in both China and the West. Topics include the rise of industrialism, the role of foreign investment, China's role in the global market place, the relationship between business and the state, state-run enterprises, factory life, entrepreneurialism, advertising, consumerism, and economic nationalism. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 397 From Mao to Now: China's Red Revolution
This course on China's Communist revolution considers the evolution of Maoism, or Chinese Communism, from its ideological origins through its implementation during and after the Chinese Communist revolution. It examines major Maoist movements such as Land Reform, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the cult of Mao. It further considers the globalization of Maoism by examining examples of other Maoist revolutions and revolutionaries in places like Cambodia, Peru, and Nepal. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Greene, J.
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 28023

HIST 398 Introduction to History of Japan: Anime to Zen
This course provides a foundation for study of Japanese history. It combines lectures on the scope of Japanese history over the past 2,000 years with discussions of topics key to the development of Japanese civilization such as religion and literature. We analyze how different media, such as film, Japanese animation (anime), and art can be used as historical sources, and how these shape our understanding of Japan. Students hone their ability to analyze both thematic and historical questions through writing assignments and discussions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 399 The Samurai
Japan's warrior class, the samurai, dominated politics and society for more than half of Japan's recorded history. This course traces the history of the samurai from their origins to the dissolution of their class in 1877, examining their military role, philosophy, and cultural contributions. It also considers continued references to the "spirit of the samurai" in the twentieth century. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rath, Eric
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 23393

HIST 450 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in History at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 353 Indigenous Peoples of North America
This course surveys the history of the first peoples to inhabit North America from prehistory to present. Commonly and collectively referred to as American Indians, indigenous peoples include a diverse array of nations, chiefdoms, confederacies, tribes, and bands, each of which has its own unique cultures, economies, and experiences in dealing with colonial and neocolonial powers. This class seeks to demonstrate this diversity while at the same time providing an understanding of the common struggle for political and cultural sovereignty that all indigenous nations face. Indigenous nations that have developed a relationship with the United States will receive primary focus, but comparative reference will be made to First Nations of Canada. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 461 The Asia-Pacific War, 1937-1945
This course introduces students to the Asia-Pacific War, which began with the outbreak of fighting between Japan and China in July 1937 and ended with the unconditional surrender of the Japanese Empire to Allied forces in August 1945. The course revolves around three themes, which are explored through lecture, discussion, and extensive use of film and visual materials: the geopolitical and colonial origins of the conflict; the concept of total war and the political and social transformations it unleashed on all belligerent nations; and the ideologies on the home front justifying the mass slaughter of soldiers and civilians. There is also discussion about how people in Japan, the United States, China, Korea, and other countries remember the war in the postwar period. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 510 Topics in Non-Western History: _____
A study of a specialized theme or topic in non-Western History. Students will examine major issues and methods of historical research through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. This course grants HIST Category II credit. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a history course numbered below 500, or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Stiller, Maya
MW 09:30-10:45 AM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 29016

HIST 512 Foodways: Latin American
This course explores the traditional foods, ways of eating, and cultural significance of food among peoples of Latin America. The course surveys the vast array of flora in Central and South America and the Caribbean, and focuses on issues of environmental protection, bioethics, food security, and the growth of farming and ranching. The class studies the impact that foods such as maize, potatoes and cacao have had globally, and includes African, Asian, and European influences on Latin cuisine, as well as health problems associated with dietary changes. (Same as HUM 552 , ISP 552, and LAA 552.) Prerequisite: Upper division course on Latin America, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 525 France and Its Empire: From Acadia to Zidane
A study of modern France through the lens of its overseas empire and the relations between French colonies and the metropolitan "Hexagon." This course studies the establishment of New France in the early modern period, the relationship between the French Revolution and colonies like Haiti, the French obsession with North Africa in the nineteenth century, the "Second Empire" at home and abroad, the French role in the Scramble for Africa and the global age of imperialism, the participation of colonial troops in the world wars, the post-World War II age of colonial wars and decolonization, and the contemporary role of imperial memory and immigrants to France from its former colonies. Prerequisite: Requires a prior history course or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 527 Recent European History, 1870 to the Present
A study of the issues and themes that have shaped the contemporary European world, exploring European politics, economy, and society from the zenith of Europe's power and influence at the turn of the century through two world wars and into the contemporary era. This survey begins with the period of consolidation of a system of major national states in western Europe and ends with the search for alternatives to that system in the break-up of empires and movements for European unity in the post-World War II era. The course also considers the emergence of the states of central and eastern Europe and examines the impact of the Russian Revolution and the Soviet state on European affairs. Not open to those who have credit in either HIST 435 or HIST 436. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 528 Economic History of Europe
An introductory study of European economic history from the Middle Ages to the 1980s. Investigates the sources of economic growth, and the interaction between economic forces and social institutions. Topics covered will include the rise of commerce, the agricultural and industrial revolutions, imperialism, the Great Depression, and European recovery after World War II. (Same as ECON 535.) Prerequisite: [ECON 104 or ECON 105] or [(ECON 142 or ECON 143) and (ECON 144 or ECON 145)]. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 531 History of American Women--1870 to Present
A survey of women's history in the United States that will include radical and reform movements, the impact of war and depression, professionalization, immigration, women's work, and the biographies of leading figures in women's history. (Same as AMS 511 and WGSS 511.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 532 History of Women and Work in Comparative Perspective
This course explores the connection between historical changes in the labor process and the occupational choices available to women in different countries. Through discussion and analyses of texts, students will evaluate the construction of a gendered division of work as shaped over time by economic, cultural, and political forces. The chronological and geographical focus may vary depending on the instructor. (Same as AMS 512 and WGSS 512.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 543 Modern Iran
A history of Iran from the sixteenth century to the present with an emphasis on religious, political, and cultural history. Topics will include the establishment of Shi'ism as the state religion in the sixteenth century, the evolution of religio-political thought among the Shi'ite clerical establishment, great power politics in the nineteenth century, European cultural and intellectual influence, nation-building and nationalism in the twentieth century, the Islamic revolution of 1979, and Iranian politics since the revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 327 and HIST 328. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 547 The Intellectual History of Europe in the Twentieth Century
This course will examine in depth the leading developments in European thought from the 1920's to the present. Topics will include: existentialism, philosophic hermeneutics, and postmodernism. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 548 Rise of Modern Britain
A study of the rise of modern Britain from the 1832 Reform Act, a major step on the path from aristocratic government to mass democratic politics. It covers the politics and society of the Victorian era, the extension of British influence overseas, the origins and social impact of two world wars, the creation of the Welfare State, the loss of Empire, and Britain's entry into Europe. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 555 British Political Thought
This course will offer an introduction to a number of classic works in British political thought, placed against their historical background. Close reading of selected texts will be combined with contextual analysis. Prerequisite: A prior history course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 556 British Political Thought, Honors
Similar in content to HIST 555. This course will offer an introduction to a number of classic works in British political thought, placed against their historical background. Close reading of selected texts will be combined with contextual analysis. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 557 Nationalism and Communism in East Central Europe from 1772 to the Present
The peoples of East Central Europe under Hapsburg, Romanov, and German rule; the dissolution of the empires, independence and the role of the new states in the European balance of power; World War II, Soviet domination, and the recent role of East Central Europe in the Communist World. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 558 Religion in Britain Since the Reformation: A Survey
This course will deal analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the theses of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from a perspective of the history of ideas. (Same as REL 558.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 559 Religion in Britain Since the Reformation: A Survey, Honors
This course deals analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from the perspective of the history of ideas. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. (Same as REL 559.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 561 Liberation in Southern Africa
This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior coursework in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as AAAS 561 and POLS 561.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 568 Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union
An exploration of the Soviet Union's creation, evolution, collapse, and legacy in contemporary Russia and Eurasia. Drawing on historical scholarship, literature, music, and film, the course examines the major trends and developments in Soviet politics, ideology, society, economy, and culture. Special attention is paid to how the multiethnic Soviet state's rise and fall reflected broader changes in the world during the "Soviet century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 570 The Middle East After World War II
An intensive study of developments and changes in the Middle East since World War II. Topics and themes will vary, but may include the long-lasting effects of European imperialism, Big Oil and the energy crisis, the Arab-Israeli conflict and peace process, American intervention in the Middle East, minority communities, and the revival of Islamic and popular protest movements. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 575 The Many Faces of Mexico
From Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas, to Spaniards, Mestizos, and Indios to Zapatistas, Narcos, and Luchadores, Mexico has been a place of vast social and cultural diversity. This class examines the history of Mexico and its many facets from the pre-Columbian period through the present. Students examine such topics as conquest and colonialism, independence and revolution, race, politics, and religion. Prerequisite: An earlier course in history or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 574 Slavery in the New World
Slavery, slave culture, and the slave trade in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean will be examined comparatively. Attention will also be given to African cultures, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, and the effects of African cultures on institutions in the New World. (Same as AAAS 574.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 575 The Many Faces of Mexico
From Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas, to Spaniards, Mestizos, and Indios to Zapatistas, Narcos, and Luchadores, Mexico has been a place of vast social and cultural diversity. This class examines the history of Mexico and its many facets from the pre-Columbian period through the present. Students examine such topics as conquest and colonialism, independence and revolution, race, politics, and religion. Prerequisite: An earlier course in history or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 576 History of the Caribbean and Central America
A comparative examination of Central America and the Caribbean. Emphasis is on understanding the complex social, cultural, and political development of this broad region from the pre-Columbian period until the modern era. Topics include: conquest, colonization, racial and ethnic diversity, economic development, political conflict, and globalization. Prerequisite: HIST 120, HIST 121, or HIST 370. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 579 The History of Brazil
The history of Brazil from European discovery to the present with emphasis on social and economic change. Topics discussed will include the Indian, African, and European backgrounds, slave society, the frontier in Brazilian development, cycles of economic growth and regionalism, the role of foreign capital, industrial development, labor, urban problems, the military in government, and human rights. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 580 Economic History of Latin America
A study of the changing economic conditions in Latin America from Colonial times through the Twentieth Century and the effect of these conditions on Latin American society. Emphasis will be on the major theoretical issues of development economics, patterns of growth, and suggested strategies for economic development. Analysis will center on changes in agriculture, industry, labor, finance, transportation and technology, urbanization, immigration, role of women, export and commerce, and foreign involvement. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kuznesof, Elizabeth
MW 12:30-01:45 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 28017

HIST 581 The Japanese Empire
Although the history of modern Japan was for a long time conventionally understood within the parameters of the nation-state, in fact modern Japanese identity coalesced around empire. This reading-intensive course explores the Japanese empire from its origins in the late nineteenth century to its collapse at the end of World War II in 1945, as well as the empires post-1945 legacies in Asia. Particular attention is paid to different forms of Japanese colonial domination practiced in Hokkaido, Okinawa, Taiwan, Korea, the South Seas Islands, Manchuria, occupied China, and Southeast Asia. We also study the ways in which the empire and colonial subjects, in turn, transformed Japanese state and society. Furthermore, we examine transnational themes the Japanese empire shared with other modern empires in areas such as colonial violence, gender, migration, settlements, war mobilization, and historical memories of the colonial experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of an East Asian history or culture course numbered below 500; or a history course numbered below 500; or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 583 Imperial China
An intensive survey of China's traditional civilization and its history, with emphasis on the last centuries of imperial rule under the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing dynasties (to 1850). (Same as EALC 583.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 584 Modern China
An intensive survey of China's history from the early 19th century to the present. Key topics include the decline of the traditional system, the rise of communism, the Maoist era, and the tensions of change and control in the 1980s and 1990s. (Same as EALC 584.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 585 Beer, Sake, Tea-Beverages in Japan History
Sake and tea are synonymous with Japan today, but the history of beverages from water to whiskey illuminates key developments in Japanese civilization. This course makes a thematic survey of Japanese beverages introducing the place of drinks in global history before examining their distinct context in Japan. Topics include the ritual consumption of beverages as in the tea ceremony; the place of alcohol in Japanese culture; locales for consuming beverages such as bars, teahouses and coffee shops; and the Westernization of taste preferences as characterized by the introduction of beer and wine. By taking this course, students gain insight into ways that beverages contribute to Japanese culture and help shape personal and national identity. Prerequisite: Successful completion of an East Asian history or culture course number below 500 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 587 Age of Shoguns: Early Modern Japan
Early modern Japan (16th to 19th century) examines the history, culture, and patterns of life during an era of rigid social control but artistic brilliance. After an historical overview of the period, students will explore topics including the social structure, travel, religion, thought, and the formation of traditional cultural forms such as Kabuki theater. (Same as EALC 587.) Prerequisite: An earlier course in history or east Asian languages and cultures, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 588 Japan, 1853-1945
This course provides an intensive survey of Japanese history from the arrival of Commodore Perry through the Pacific War. Social, economic, and political themes will be emphasized. Among the topics covered will be the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, Japanese imperialism, Taisho democracy, and wartime mobilization. (Same as EALC 588.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 589 Japan Since 1945
This course provides an overview of Japanese history from the end of World War II to the present day. Among the topics covered will be the Allied Occupation, postwar politics and social change, the economic "miracle," popular culture, women and the family, crime and punishment, the educational system, and Japan's place in the world. (Same as EALC 589.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 590 Cultural History of Korea
This course examines the cultural history of Korea in periods prior to the 19th Century. Special attention is given to varying constructions of cultural value, heritage, and identity, together with the historically specific factors that engendered them. (Same as EALC 563.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 591 Food in History: West and East
A survey of scholarship on food in the West and in East Asia, choosing works primarily by historians, but also by sociologists, geographers, and anthropologists. We consider how scholars have approached issues concerning food productions and consumption, what habits of eating reveal about daily life, and how and when food is embedded with historiography related to these topics, keeping in mind the famous maxim of the noted French gastronome Brillat-Savarin (d. 1826): "Tell me what you eat: I will tell you what you are. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 593 Modern Korea
This course will examine selected topics in Modern Korean history in the 19th and 20th centuries, with special emphasis on Korea's connections to China and Japan. (Same as EALC 593.) Prerequisite: A college-level course in East Asian history or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 596 Defining Japan: Marginalized Groups and the Construction of National Identity
This course investigates the construction of national identity in modern Japan by examining the historical experiences of groups marginalized by mainstream society. We will explore the pressures of conformity, the pervasiveness of social ostracism and the surprising diversity in Japanese society. Among the groups discussed will be indigenous peoples (the Ainu, Okinawans), the Korean minority, the outcast class (burakumin), the sick and disabled, the Yakuza, and political activists. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 597 Japanese Theater History
This course examines the historical development and characteristics of Japanese theater, with special attention to traditional theater and the genres of noh, kyogen, and kabuki in particular, tracing their origins in the pre-modern era and their continued performance today. To gain an understanding of the historical and artistic setting of these arts, lectures and readings will consider broader issues such as performance and ritual in religion and daily life, gender and representation, and folk theater. A portion of this class will include practical studies of theatrical forms including noh dance and kabuki music (shamisen). LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 598 Sexuality and Gender in African History
An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Graduate students will complete an additional project in consultation with the instructor. (Same as AAAS 598 and WGSS 598.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 600 West African History
A study of the political, social, and economic development of West Africa until the colonial era. Major focus will be on the role of state formation, trade, ecology, and urbanization in the formation of centralized politics from the 11th to the 16th centuries and the impact of the process of Islamization and Muslim revolution on political and socioeconomic change in selected West African societies in the 19th century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 603 History of Tibet
This course surveys the cultural and political history of Tibet from the eighth to the twentieth century. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, students gain familiarity with the dominant features of Tibetan civilization. Topics include the relationship between Tibet and the civilizations of India and China, Tibetan Buddhism, and the tensions between the struggle for Tibetan independence versus claims of Chinese sovereignty. The course also considers the Tibetan diaspora and the reception of knowledge about Tibetan civilization in the West. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 604 Contemporary Greater China
This course considers contemporary China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in comparative perspective. It begins in the early twentieth century so as to set up a comparison between Nationalist, Communist and Colonial China. It focuses on the evolution from the 1940s to the present studying the political, economic and social systems of the three regions that constitute what we now call 'Greater China' and considers, in particular, important points of difference and similarity between them. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 636 Agriculture in World History
A survey of the development of agriculture from prehistory through the present. The major themes of the course will be how various methods of farming have spread around the world, how new techniques have transformed agriculture, and how peasants and farmers have interacted with cities and governments. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 640 Entrepreneurship in East Asia
An intensive examination of the history and current status of entrepreneurship in China, Japan, and other nations in East Asia. This course investigates the role of entrepreneurs in Asian economic development from the nineteenth century to the present, as well as the relation between entrepreneurship and Asian cultural traditions. The opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship in East Asia today are also considered. (Same as EALC 520.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 660 Biography of a City: _____
These interdisciplinary, team-taught courses survey the artistic, intellectual, and historical development of the great cities of the world. London, Paris, and Rome have been offered in recent semesters, and other cities will be studied in the future. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 661 Palestine and Antiquity
A survey of the history of Palestine from biblical origins to the Muslim conquest, with emphasis on such topics as social and religious institutions, cultural and communal diversity, and relations between foreign powers and local authorities. The course further explores the roots of the present conflictual situation in this part of the Middle East. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 670 Comparative Diasporas
This course examines history from the point of view of diasporas, groups who move across established borders but maintain an identity linked to an original homeland. This course examines commonalities and differences in the diaspora experience by looking comparatively at a range of prominent cases, including the Jewish, African, Armenian, Greek, Turkish, German, Irish, Italian, South Asian, and Chinese diasporas, the "Gypsies," and the internal diasporas of multiethnic states like Russia. The course also gives students the opportunity to pursue research on a diaspora of their own choosing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HIST 696 Seminar in: _____
A seminar designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of historical inquiry. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completion of 75 credit hours of undergraduate study and completion of HIST 301, and recommended completion of one 500 level history course, or consent of the instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC MacGonagle, Elizabeth
W 10:00-12:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 17274
LEC Moran, Jeffrey
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 20054

HIST 705 Globalization in History
A study of the increasing interaction among world societies since 1500 and an investigation of the long-term developments behind current world problems. Major topics include western expansion since 1500, the spread of state sovereignty, the formation of a world economy, and spread of international institutions. The current world problems investigated will vary, but may include issues such as environmental crises, human rights, migration, free trade and the spread of consumer culture, ethnicity and nationalism, and international intervention within states. (Same as GIST 705.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HISTORY OF ART

HA 100 Introduction to Western Art History
A chronological survey of Western art and architecture, including the ancient Near East, Europe from antiquity to the present, and North America from the colonial period to the present. The course emphasizes major historical and cultural developments, analyzes key art works and monuments, and introduces basic art historical principles and analytical methods. The course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels, with additional reading and writing assigned at the 300 level. Intended for non-majors. Does not count toward the 30 required hours in the major. Not open to students with credit in HA 103, HA 150, HA 151, HA 160, HA 161, or HA 300. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 15377
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 18594
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20387

HA 151 History of Western Art: Renaissance to Contemporary
A survey of art in the West from the Renaissance to the contemporary period in Europe and America, with special emphasis on the achievements of individual artists in relation to the cultural movements of their times. Not open to students with credit in HA 161. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 161 History of Western Art: Renaissance to Contemporary, Honors
A survey of the art in West from the Renaissance to the contemporary period in Europe and America, with special emphasis on the achievements of individual artists in relation to the cultural movements of their times. Not open to students with credit in HA 151. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 165 Introduction to Asian Art
This course examines major forms of artistic expression in India, China, and Japan. Discussions introduce basic art concepts, the themes and purposes of art, and different art styles in Asia from ancient times to the present. Students develop critical skills through analyzing, writing about, and talking about art and Asian cultures. Students also learn about important museums in North America and Asia. No prior knowledge of art history or Asia expected. Not open to students with credit in HA 166. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 166 The Visual Arts of East Asia
This course examines major forms of artistic expression in China, Korea, and Japan. Discussions introduce basic art concepts, the themes and purposes of art, and different art styles in East Asia from ancient times to the present. Students develop critical skills through analyzing, writing about, and talking about art and East Asian cultures. Students also learn about important museums in North America and Asia. No prior knowledge of art history or East Asia expected. Not open to students with credit in HA 165. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 21232
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 28372

HA 261 Introduction to Modern Art
This course considers the efforts of artists to explore and represent their place in the modern world. The political, industrial, and scientific revolutions of the late 18th and 19th centuries in the West overturned the certainties of traditional authority and liberated artists to raise new questions. Innovations ranged from Impressionism's light-filled landscapes to Surrealism's dream imagery, Abstract Expressionism's paint-spattered canvases, and Pop Art's celebration of consumer culture. This course addresses these and other modern art movements, emphasizing developments in Europe and the United States through the late 20th century and concluding with international contemporary art in an age of globalization. Intended for non-majors. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 309 - LAWRENCE
3 23834

HA 300 Introduction to Western Art History
A chronological survey of Western art and architecture, including the ancient Near East, Europe from antiquity to the present, and North America from the colonial period to the present. The course emphasizes major historical and cultural developments, analyzes key art works and monuments, and introduces basic art historical principles and analytical methods. The course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels, with additional reading and writing assigned at the 300 level. Intended for non-majors. Does not count toward the 30 required hours in the major. Not open to students with credit in HA 100, HA 103, HA 150, HA 151, HA 160, HA 161, or HA 303. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 15378
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 18595
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20388

HA 300 Introduction to Western Art History
A chronological survey of Western art and architecture, including the ancient Near East, Europe from antiquity to the present, and North America from the colonial period to the present. The course emphasizes major historical and cultural developments, analyzes key art works and monuments, and introduces basic art historical principles and analytical methods. The course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels, with additional reading and writing assigned at the 300 level. Intended for non-majors. Does not count toward the 30 required hours in the major. Not open to students with credit in HA 100, HA 103, HA 150, HA 151, HA 160, HA 161, or HA 303. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 15378
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 18595
LEC
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 20388

HA 310 The Art and Architecture of Florence and Paris
Taught in the Humanities and Western Civilization Program Abroad, this course examines the major movements that defined and shaped the art and architecture of Florence and Paris, with special attention to the Renaissance in Florence and the Gothic and modern periods in Paris. Through classroom lectures, readings, and visits to museums, churches, and other historic sites, selected works of art and architecture are analyzed in terms of their formal qualities, iconography, and cultural context. Prerequisite: Approval for enrollment in the Humanities and Western Civilization Study Abroad program through the KU Office of Study Abroad. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 311 The Art and Architecture of the British Isles
Taught in the British Summer Institute in the Humanities Study Abroad program, this course offers an introductory survey of British art and architecture. Through classroom lectures, readings, and visits to museums, churches, and other historic sites, selected works of art and architecture are analyzed in terms of their formal qualities, iconography, and cultural context. Prerequisite: Approval for enrollment in the British Summer Institute in the Humanities Study Abroad program through the KU Office of Study Abroad. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 340 Special Study in Asian Art Before 1900: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Asian art before 1900, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. The course is taught at the 300 and 500-levels with additional work required at the 500-level. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Fowler, Sherry
MW 12:30-01:45 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 22405

HA 353 Modern and Contemporary African Art
In this course, we examine the development of artistic modernisms in Africa in historical context. We also study the content, production, patronage, and display of modern and contemporary African art. In doing so, we consider African artists' engagement with modernity, globalization, and contemporary issues, as well as interrogate influential myths and assumptions regarding African artists and the work they produce. Course themes include the workshop as a critical site, independence movements and the creation of national art forms, art as global commodity, and art in resistance, remembrance, and revolution. Not open to students with credit in AAAS 569/HA 569. (Same as AAAS 353.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gerschultz, Jessica
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 25238

HA 363 Modern Korean Art and Culture
This course is a thematic introduction to Korean art and culture with an emphasis on modern and contemporary Korea. Pre-modern works are contextualized with respect to contemporary issues. Students learn how to conduct a comprehensive analysis of an artwork by considering the political, historical and social conditions of its time within a broader East Asian cultural framework. Prerequisite: An introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
M 06:00-07:15 PM ONLNE ZOOM - LAWRENCE
3 20080
LEC Stiller, Maya
M 06:00-07:15 PM ONLNE ZOOM - LAWRENCE
3 22622

HA 367 Art and Culture of Japan
The history of Japanese art interpreted from visual, historical, social, religious, and political perspectives. Representative topics: archaeological discoveries, Buddhist images and architecture, gender relationships expressed through art, interactions with different countries, and the roots of modernism in Japanese art. Art history goals: direct engagement with museum collections and enhanced ability to analyze, write about, and talk about art. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 369 Art and Culture of Korea
The history of Korean art interpreted from visual, historical, social, religious, and political perspectives. Representative topics: archaeological discoveries, Buddhist images and architecture, gender relationships expressed through art, interactions with different countries, and the roots of modernism in Korean art. Art history goals: direct engagement with museum collections and enhanced ability to analyze, write about, and talk about art. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 370 American Art
A survey of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from colonial to recent times. Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 372 Baroque Art in Europe
This course surveys significant 17th-century paintings, sculpture and architecture that were produced in Italy, Spain, France and the Southern and Northern Netherlands. Artists whose works are discussed include Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt and Vermeer. Artistic elements of individual works, major changes in patronage, and the religious, political, economic and cultural contexts in which the art was produced are examined. Assigned readings present a range of methodological perspectives. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 376 West African Art
Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the pre-historic cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. (Same as AAAS 376.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 579 Southern Baroque Art
This course surveys significant 17th-century paintings, sculpture and architecture produced in Italy, Spain and France. Artists whose works will be discussed include Caravaggio, the Carracci, Bernini, Borromini, Velazquez, Poussin, Claude Lorrain, De la Tour and the Le Nain brothers. Artistic elements of individual works and their relationship to major changes in patronage and religious, political, economic and cultural contexts will be examined. Assigned readings will present a range of methodological perspectives. Prerequisite: An appropriate introductory course in Western art history at the college level, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 388 Modern and Contemporary Visual Arts of Japan
This course covers Japanese visual arts from the Meiji era (1868-1912) through the present day. The course is designed thematically as well as chronologically, and examines painting, sculpture and architecture focusing on both socio-political contexts and artistic concerns that emerged at certain times in recent Japanese history. The aim of this course is to provide first-hand knowledge of Japanese modern and contemporary visual arts as well as an in-depth consideration of some of the key issues attached to Japan's modernization and modernity. The course is taught at the 300 and 500-levels with additional work required at the 500-level. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kaneko, Maki
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 28375

HA 390 Special Study in African Art: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in African art, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 391 Special Study in Asian Art: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Asian art, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 467 Art and Culture of Japan, Honors
An introduction to the arts of Japan using fundamental principles and analytical methods of art history. Emphasis is placed on cultural contexts of art production, including history and religion. Honors version of HA 367, with more classroom discussion and opportunities for original research. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. Not open to freshmen or students with credit in HA 267 or HA 367. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 468 Art and Culture of China, Honors
An introduction to the arts of China using fundamental principles and analytical methods of art history. Emphasis is placed on cultural contexts of art production, including history and religion. Honors version of HA 368, with more classroom discussion and opportunities for original research. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. Not open to freshmen or students with credit in HA 268 or HA 368. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 469 Art and Culture of Korea, Honors
An introduction to the arts of Korea using fundamental principles and analytical methods of art history. Emphasis is placed on cultural contexts of art production, including history and religion. Honors version of HA 369, with more classroom discussion and opportunities for original research. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. Not open to freshmen or students with credit in HA 269 or HA 369. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 488 Chinese Painting, Honors
A survey of the development of painting in China, beginning with the earliest forms of figural and landscape depiction. Emphasis will be is placed on the major painting traditions of the Song, Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties. Prerequisite: An introductory course in art history or Eastern Civilizations and membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 505 Special Study: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in art history on a trial basis, open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisite: An introductory-level course in art history, appropriate to the specific special study topic; or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hoopes, John
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM CDUP 1200 - LAWRENCE
3 28985

HA 533 European Art 1789-1848: Gender and Revolution
This course will analyze painting in Europe from the late 18th century to the mid-19th century. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which images represent and/or repress such themes as politics, history, gender, ethnicity, race, and class. Assigned readings present a variety of methodological perspectives--social-historical, feminist, formalist, and psychoanalytic. Graduate students may be expected to complete additional reading and writing assignments. (Same as WGSS 533.) Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 534 Art in France 1848-1900: Modernisms
This course will examine painting in France from 1848 to 1900 with particular emphasis given to the visual articulation and/or repression of such constructs as gender, race, history, and ethnicity. Assigned readings present a variety of methodological perspectives--social-historical, feminist, formalist, and psychoanalytic. Graduate students may be expected to complete additional reading and writing assignments. (Same as WGSS 534.) Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kessler, Marni
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 28769

HA 545 Early Chinese Art
A survey of Chinese art from Neolithic times through the Han Dynasty (ca. 200 C.E.). Emphasis will be placed on recent archaeological excavations and also on the development of bronze vessels of the Shang and Zhou Dynasties. Prerequisite: A college level introduction to Asian art history, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 546 Chinese Sculpture
A survey of Chinese sculpture from the Shang dynasty through the Song dynasty (1600 BCE-1279 CE), focused on sculptural programs in native funerary art and Buddhist temples and cave-shrines. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 550 Capstone in Art History: _____
An advanced course dedicated to the in-depth study of special topics in art history. Students conduct research on a question within the parameters of the course topic and produce a research product that integrates knowledge from within the discipline of art history or in combination with other disciplines to generate new ideas. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and twelve hours of art history, or consent of the instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hedeman, Anne
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 24026
LEC Stiller, Maya
MW 09:30-10:45 AM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 21907
LEC Kaneko, Maki
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 22409
LEC Stone-Ferrier, Linda
MW 12:30-01:45 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 22410
LEC Pultz, John
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 22411
LEC Fowler, Sherry
MW 12:30-01:45 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 23684
LEC Kessler, Marni
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 24245
LEC Marina, Areli
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 24621
LEC Cateforis, David
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 28772

HA 564 European Art, 1900-1945
A detailed survey of modern European art from the turn of the century through World War II. Movements to be considered may include post-impressionism, cubism, constructivism, dada, and surrealism. Graduate students may be expected to do additional reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 578 Central African Art
Introduction to the arts and cultures of Central Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Equatorial Forest and the Southern Savanna regions of Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, Zaire, and Angola. The historical and cultural contexts for the visual arts associated with centralized leadership and non-centralized societies are explored. (Same as AAAS 578.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 585 The Art of Buddhism
A survey of Buddhist visual arts (architecture, sculpture, and painting) of India, China, Japan, and Korea. Through an examination of the history of Buddhist art interpreted from visual, historical, social, and political perspectives, the course enables students to analyze a wide range of Buddhist art forms within their regional contexts. Students will also consider how Buddhist-related material functions within museums and engage with local collections. The course is taught at the 300 and 500-levels with additional work required at the 500-level. Not open to students with credit in HA 385. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 587 Japanese Sculpture
A survey of Japanese sculpture from the Kofun period (300-700 C.E.) to the present day. Emphasis is placed on works of Buddhist sculpture from the 7th through the 13th centuries. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Asian art history or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 588 Modern and Contemporary Visual Arts of Japan
This course covers Japanese visual arts from the Meiji era (1868-1912) through the present day. The course is designed thematically as well as chronologically, and examines painting, sculpture and architecture focusing on both socio-political contexts and artistic concerns that emerged at certain times in recent Japanese history. The aim of this course is to provide first-hand knowledge of Japanese modern and contemporary visual arts as well as an in-depth consideration of some of the key issues attached to Japan's modernization and modernity. Prerequisite: An introductory course in art history or consent of instructor. The course is taught at the 300 and 500-levels with additional work required at the 500-level. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kaneko, Maki
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 28376

HA 589 Japanese Artistic Encounters with Europe and the United States
Consideration of Japanese artistic responses to visual culture from Europe and the United States. The course focuses upon Japanese art from the 16th century to the present. Prerequisite: A college-level introduction to Asian art history or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 591 Special Study in Asian Art: ______
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Asian art, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. Prerequisite: An appropriate introductory-level course in art history or Asian Studies, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 600 Biography of a City: _____
An interdisciplinary study of a city, covering its history, literature, and arts during the periods when the city's culture reached its height. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 676 West African Art
Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the archaeological cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and the meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. Upper division and graduate students can enroll for this course with appropriate course requirements. Not open to students who have taken AAAS 376/HA 376. (Same as AAAS 676.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 677 African Design
This course examines the conceptualization of the "decorative" arts in Africa, including textiles, metals, ceramics, wall decoration, and jewelry, and investigates the relation of this art historical category to modernism. How did such a wide range of artistic practices come to be grouped together? Are terms such as "decorative art" and "craft" still operative, and how do they reflect ideas about race and gender? How have African artists approached "traditional" design? What social factors influenced artistic processes and what is the historical symbolism of medium? To address these questions, we will consider artists' writings, art schools and apprenticeships, gender dynamics, transnational artistic exchanges, the concept of the artist-artisan, and the meaning of material and process. Our discussions will span historical and contemporary contexts, and also will examine colonial systems of classification, gender norms and laws, practices of appropriation, and tourism. Not open to students with credit in AAAS 377/HA 377. (Same as AAAS 677.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an Art History course 100 level or above, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 679 African Expressive Culture: _____
An in-depth examination of an artistic tradition shared by a number of African cultures. Discussion includes historical development related to style, use and meaning and other relevant issues critical to the topic. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as AAAS 679.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 720 Asian Art: Theory and Method
This course examines important methodologies and theories of the past and present employed in the field of Asian art history. Through critical reading of primary documents and secondary scholarship, students will gain historical perspective on and practical tools for research in the history of Asian art and visual culture. Prerequisite: Nine hours of History of Art or consent of instructor. SEM.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
SEM McNair, Amy
Kaneko, Maki
W 02:30-05:00 PM SMA 103 - LAWRENCE
3 28425

HA 789 Proseminar in Chinese Art
Critical analysis of readings on selected topics in Chinese art. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HA 980 Seminar in Chinese Art: _____
A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

HONORS

HNRS 492 Topics and Problems on: _____
An interdisciplinary study of different topics. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Stein, Matthew N
W 02:30-05:00 PM NUN 102 - LAWRENCE
3 23862
LEC Stein, Matthew N
W 01:00-01:50 PM NUN 102 - LAWRENCE
1 28605
LEC Mulligan, Lumen
M 04:00-04:50 PM GRN 201 - LAWRENCE
1 23886

HUNGARIAN

INDIGENOUS STUDIES

ISP 101 Introduction to Indigenous Nations Studies
An introduction to the study of Indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods, and content relevant to Applied Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from diverse cultures. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of American Indian life are interconnected and that tribal histories cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. Students are introduced to controversies over how to research, write, and interpret American Indians, and will address the foundations of Indigenous Studies, and that is Indigenous concepts of decolonization, empowerment and Nation-building. The course explores how the lives of Indigenous people have been affected by colonization, while exploring the varying definitions of "colonialism", "colonizer" and the "colonized. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ISP 305 World Indigenous Literatures
A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305/GIST 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ISP 330 Native American Religions
A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative (myth), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Not open to students who have completed ISP 331 or REL 331. (Same as REL 330.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ISP 348 American Indian and White Relations to 1865
This course provides an intensive survey of the Indians of North America from Prehistory to 1865, and focuses on ancient indigenous cultures, early European-Indian relations and the impact of European culture upon the indigenous peoples of North America. (Same as HIST 351, HWC 348.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Mihesuah, Devon
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 28188

ISP 504 Topics in Indigenous Studies: _____
This course concentrates on selected problems in the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Studies. Courses in this field utilize methods developed in various disciplines in order to examine issues related to the survival, self-sufficiency, mutual support, empowerment, and decolonization of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Recommended for juniors or seniors, or for students who have completed ISP 101/GINS 101/INS 101. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ISP 601 Indigenous Peoples of the World
A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GEOG 601 and GIST 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

INTERNATIONAL

ITALIAN

ITAL 100 Italian for Reading Knowledge
Special course for candidates for advanced degrees. Fundamentals of grammar and reading of material of medium difficulty. Open to graduate students and to seniors planning graduate study. Does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study of Italian. Conducted in English. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 103 Elementary Italian Language and Civilization
A systematic review of the fundamentals of Italian grammar through practice in conversation and writing, with an introduction to Italian culture. Available only to participants in study abroad programs. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. No prerequisite. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 107 Elementary Italian Conversation I
First part of a two-course sequence (with 108) for students with no previous study of a foreign language and minimal linguistic background as well as for students in professional schools who plan to participate in study abroad programs in Italy. Offers knowledge of essential grammar and basic oral communication skills through practice in grammar, listening comprehension, and conversation. Active participation required. Completion of both ITAL 107 and ITAL 108 is equivalent to ITAL 110 and allows students to enroll in ITAL 120. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 108 Elementary Italian Conversation II
A continuation of ITAL 107, second part of a two-course sequence for students with no previous study of a foreign language and minimal linguistic background as well as for students in professional schools who plan to participate in study abroad programs in Italy. Offers knowledge of essential grammar and basic oral communication skills through practice in grammar, listening comprehension, and conversation. Active participation required. Completion of both ITAL 107 and ITAL 108 is equivalent to ITAL 110 and allows students to enroll in ITAL 120. Prerequisite: ITAL 107 or Italian Coordinator's approval. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 110 Elementary Italian I
Introduction to Italian language and culture. Essentials of grammar and practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Active participation required. Five hours of class per week. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Ghezzo, Paola
MTuWThF 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 11839
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Ghezzo, Paola
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 11840
LEC de Fazio, Marina
MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 15859
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Bodle, Lauralyn
MTuWThF 12:00-12:50 PM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 11841
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Ferrara, Massimo
MTuWThF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 11842
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Bodle, Lauralyn
MTuWThF 02:00-02:50 PM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 11843
LEC de Fazio, Marina
MTuWThF 03:00-03:50 PM WES 4075 - LAWRENCE
5 11844

ITAL 120 Elementary Italian II
Five hours of class. Reading of simple texts; diction; speaking; elementary composition. Prerequisite: ITAL 110. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Hammond, Mary
MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
5 16918

ITAL 155 Intensive Basic Italian I
First part of a two-course sequence (with ITAL 156) for students with previous language study or strong linguistic background. Same content as ITAL 110 but accomplished in three hours of class per week. Active participation required. Prerequisite: Previous study of another language or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Bowen III, Edward
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4038 - LAWRENCE
3 20162

ITAL 156 Intensive Basic Italian II
A continuation of ITAL 155, second part of a two-course sequence for students with previous language study or strong linguistic background. Same content as ITAL 120 but accomplished in three hours of class per week. Active participation required. Prerequisite: ITAL 155 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Italian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Di Nino, Nicola
TuTh 09:00-10:15 AM FR 206 - LAWRENCE
3 23826

ITAL 230 Intermediate Italian I
Review and expansion of grammatical structures introduced in Elementary Italian I and II, with continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing, coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Active participation required. Prerequisite: ITAL 120 or ITAL 156. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Ferrara, Massimo
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM FR 206 - LAWRENCE
3 11845
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Ferrara, Massimo
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 11846
LEC de Fazio, Marina
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM FR 219 - LAWRENCE
3 19452

ITAL 240 Intermediate Italian II
Continuation of ITAL 230. (ITAL 240 completes foreign language requirement.) Review and expansion of grammatical structures introduced in Elementary Italian I and II, with continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing, coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Active participation required. Prerequisite: ITAL 230. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC de Fazio, Marina
Bowen III, Edward
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 14509

ITAL 300 Composition and Conversation
Study of advanced grammatical structures with extensive practice in writing and conversation. Guided discussions on a variety of contemporary Italian literary, journalistic, and cinematic works. Active participation required. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or permission of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC de Fazio, Marina
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4022 - LAWRENCE
3 11847

ITAL 301 Introduction to Italian Literature and Textual Analysis
Readings, textual analysis, and writing on a broad selection of Italian texts from different genres and periods, ranging from the medieval origins to contemporary literary culture. This course develops cultural and critical literacy as well as oral and written proficiency, and is a gateway to upper-division courses in the major and minor. Emphasis on study of Italian literature in its cultural context, history, politics, and society. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or reading knowledge of Italian. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Ceccagnoli, Patrizio
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 4046 - LAWRENCE
3 15104

ITAL 303 Italian Language and Civilization I
An advanced study of Italian grammar, conversation, composition, with selected aspects of Italian civilization. Available only to participants in the KU summer language institute or semester abroad program in Florence or Rome. Prerequisite: ITAL 240. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 304 Italian Language and Civilization II
An advanced study of Italian grammar, conversation, composition, with selected aspects of Italian civilization. Available only to participants in the KU summer language institute or semester abroad program in Florence or Rome. Prerequisite: ITAL 303. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 315 Advanced Composition and Conversation
Continuation of ITAL 300. Study of advanced grammatical structures with extensive practice in writing and conversation. Guided discussions on a variety of contemporary Italian literary, journalistic, and cinematic works. Active participation required. Prerequisite: ITAL 300 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 336 Italy and the Italians
Survey of Italian culture with study of art and architecture, literary masterpieces in translation, science, culinary arts, and cinema. Lecture, discussion, and supportive readings. Not open to native speakers of Italian. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 340 Studies in Italian Culture: _____
A study of particular aspects of and/or periods in Italian culture. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 405 Italian Literature in Translation: _____
Major works representing various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated with departmental permission. All work done in English. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 405 Italian Literature in Translation: _____
Major works representing various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated with departmental permission. All work done in English. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 410 19th and 20th Century Short Stories
A survey of representative short stories of the 19th and 20th Centuries, including Verga, Panzini, Pirandello, Guareschi, Moravia, Calvino, Landolfi, and Bigiaretti. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or reading knowledge of Italian or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 420 19th and 20th Century Poetry
A survey of 19th and 20th century poets and their works, including Leopardi, Pascoli, d'Annunzio, Govoni, Palazzeschi, Gozzano, Marinetti, Boccioni, Ungaretti, Montale, Quasimodo, and Pasolini. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or reading knowledge of Italian or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 430 Dante's Masterpiece
Detailed study of Dante's epic poem with a close reading of the Inferno. Prerequisite: ITAL 300 or demonstrated knowledge of Italian. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 465 19th and 20th Century Novels I
With Italian 466, a survey of representative 19th and 20th century novels including those of Manzoni, Pirandello, Svevo, Deledda, Vittorini, Moravia, Pavese, Pratolini, Buzzati, Ginzburg, and Calvino. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or reading knowledge of Italian or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 466 19th and 20th Century Novels II
See ITAL 465. Prerequisite: ITAL 240 or reading knowledge of Italian or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

ITAL 495 Directed Readings in Italian
May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed nine hours. Various fields of Italian literature. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, given only to those having demonstrated ease in reading Italian. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Bowen III, Edward
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 20767
IND Ceccagnoli, Patrizio
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 16472

ITAL 499 Honors in Italian
Various topics in Italian literature or culture. Minimum of three hours of Italian 499 required for a B.A. with Honors in the Italian option of the French degree. Students must discuss Honors eligibility and their topic with a faculty member before enrolling. Honors paper must be written in Italian. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Ceccagnoli, Patrizio
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 18055

ITAL 695 Graduate Directed Readings in Italian
May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed nine hours. Directed readings, conferences with instructor. Prerequisite: ITAL 495 or consent of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Ceccagnoli, Patrizio
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 16473

JAPANESE

JPN 100 Beginning Japanese I
An introduction to Japanese. Familiarity with the basic structural patterns of the language through conversation is stressed. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are introduced and a few characters are learned. Usually offered as part of a Summer Study Abroad Program. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 101 Beginning Japanese II
Continuation of JPN 100. Available to students who took JPN 100 as part of the Summer Study Abroad Program. Not available for credit for students who have previously completed JPN 104. Prerequisite: JPN 100 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 104 Elementary Japanese I
Three hours of lecture, three hours of drill per week. Acquisition of basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing). Not available for credit for students who have previously completed JPN 101. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Childs, Maggie
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4041 - LAWRENCE
5 24566
LEC Childs, Maggie
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4041 - LAWRENCE
5 24567
LBN Mitsugi, Sanako
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM WES 4037 - LAWRENCE
5 24568
LBN Mitsugi, Sanako
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4014 - LAWRENCE
5 24569
LBN Wang, Tingting
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM SUM 502 - LAWRENCE
5 24570
LBN Wang, Tingting
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4014 - LAWRENCE
5 24571

JPN 108 Elementary Japanese II
Continuation of JPN 104. Prerequisite: JPN 101, JPN 104, or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Japanese. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 204 Intermediate Japanese I
Three hours of lecture, three hours of drill. Prerequisite: JPN 108 or equivalent. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Daldorph, Misae
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM MS 105 - LAWRENCE
5 21334
LBN Naito-Billen, Yuka
MWF 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4010 - LAWRENCE
5 17792
LBN Daldorph, Misae
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM SUM 514 - LAWRENCE
5 11890
LBN Daldorph, Misae
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM SUM 514 - LAWRENCE
5 20230

JPN 206 Intermediate Japanese Conversation
Enhancement of conversational ability at the intermediate level. Used primarily to accommodate transfer credits. Prerequisite: JPN 204 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 208 Intermediate Japanese II
Continuation of JPN 204. Prerequisite: JPN 204. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 226 Japanese in Context - Intermediate
Supervised and individualized study and practice of language skills through direct experience in interviews and guided practical applications in various public settings in Japan. Some conventional classroom instruction in grammar included. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. Prerequisite: Two semesters or the equivalent of Japanese language study. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 306 Advanced Japanese Conversation I
Intensive practice of communicative skills at the advanced level. Prerequisite: JPN 208 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 310 Advanced Japanese Conversation II
Continuation of JPN 306. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 326 Japanese in Context - Advanced
Supervised and individualized study and practice of language skills through direct experience in interviews and guided practical applications in various public settings in Japan. Some conventional classroom instruction in grammar and usage. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. Prerequisite: Four semesters or the equivalent of Japanese language study. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 333 Special Skills in Japanese: _____
Instruction in special skills in Japanese, such as pronunciation, recognition of Chinese characters, comprehension of broadcast media, etc. at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the office of KU Study Abroad and approved by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 386 Advanced Japanese Conversation III
Instruction in discussion in formal contexts and speech making. Prerequisite: JPN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 498 Directed Readings in Japanese
Readings in Japanese on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Childs, Maggie
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 11891
IND Gerbert, Elaine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 11892
IND Mitsugi, Sanako
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 18978

JPN 504 Advanced Modern Japanese I
Readings in selected modern Japanese texts on various topics: history, education, language, society, business, and literature. Meets three hours per week. Prerequisite: JPN 208 or equivalent. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Naito-Billen, Yuka
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4041 - LAWRENCE
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM WES 1005 - LAWRENCE
5 11893

JPN 508 Advanced Modern Japanese II
Continuation of JPN 504. Prerequisite: JPN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 542 Introduction to Classical Japanese I
Introductory grammar and readings in classical Japanese texts. Prerequisite: JPN 508. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 562 Modern Japanese Texts I
Readings and interpretation of modern Japanese texts from various fields. Continued study of the language in the form of oral discussion and written reports. Prerequisite: JPN 508. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Naito-Billen, Yuka
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4022 - LAWRENCE
3 11894

JPN 564 Modern Japanese Texts II
A continuation of JPN 562. Prerequisite: JPN 562 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 569 Advanced Business Japanese
This course strengthens reading and writing skills and continues developing conversational ability. It assumes a higher level of competency in Japanese and includes both verbal and non-verbal aspects of Japanese business practices. Prerequisite: Completion of third-year Japanese or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 598 Readings in: _____
Students will read selections from materials on a given topic or topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: JPN 564 or permission of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Gerbert, Elaine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 28833

JPN 690 Seminar in: _____
Varying topics with varying prerequisites. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JPN 801 Directed Readings and Research in Japanese
Advanced language training for the study of Japanese sources in the humanities or social science field of the student. Prerequisite: JPN 564 or consent of instructor. RSH.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
RSH Childs, Maggie
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 11895
RSH Gerbert, Elaine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 11896
RSH Mitsugi, Sanako
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 21850
RSH Rath, Eric
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 16377

JEWISH STUDIES

JWSH 107 Jews, Christians, Muslims
A basic introduction to the major religious traditions of the Near East, Europe, and the Americas, with an emphasis on their development through the modern period and their expressions in contemporary life. Not open to students who have taken JWSH 109 or REL 109. (Same as REL 107.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zahn, Molly
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 19381

JWSH 300 Topics in Jewish Studies:_____
Examination of special topics in Jewish Studies. May be repeated if topic varies. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zeedan, Rami
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM FR 221 - LAWRENCE
3 28480

JWSH 311 Narratives of Jewish Life
The course focuses on the narratives through which Jews made sense of their lives under the impact of the forces of modernity, beginning in the "old world," and moving through the 19th century and into the 20th. The goal is to analyze how the imagination of Jewish writers was captured by the changes in social structures such as new educational, residential and occupational opportunities, leading to increased interactions with the gentile society. Students read and discuss literary works based in the shtetl in revolutionary Russia, and in America. We will also look at memoirs and letters written by ordinary Jews. All assigned texts will be in English. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 315 The Spanish Inquisition
A broad historical study of the Spanish Inquisition from 1478 to its afterlife in modern culture, including its use in political debates and its depiction in popular culture. Topics include anti-Semitism, the nature of the inquisitorial investigation, the use of torture, censorship and the relationship between the Inquisition, the Spanish monarchy and other religious and lay authorities. Taught in English. Will not count toward the Spanish major. (Same as HIST 325 and SPAN 302.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 318 Jews and Slavs in Eastern Europe
Jews and Slavs have shared territory from the Middle Ages to the present day. The contact between these culturally and linguistically distinct groups have shaped many centuries of Eastern European history - from the extreme violence of the pogroms to long periods of peaceful coexistence and cooperation. "Jews and Slavs" examines the history and cultural geography of Slavic-Jewish contact from the perspectives of both groups. Through literature, film, journalism, and folklore, students learn about the profound influence Jews and Slavs have had on each other, the uneasy feelings that accompanied their interactions, and the creative and fascinating impact their interaction had on both cultures. (Same as SLAV 318.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 327 Jewish Secular Culture
By examining the modern concept of Yiddishkeit (Jewishness), this course explores Jewish secularism as a set of modern intellectual, literary, and cultural practices that redefined the relationship between the secular and religious in literature, music, theatre, art, humor, and foodways. This interdisciplinary course draws on theoretical approaches from history, cultural studies, religious studies, folklore, and linguistics to examine the different secularizing cultural practices of the Jews in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as in North America. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 335 History of Jewish Women
This course explores the history of Jewish women from antiquity to the twentieth century. It examines the historical constructions of women's gender roles and identities in Jewish law and custom as well as the social and cultural impact of those constructions in the context of the realities of women's lives in both Jewish and non-Jewish society. (Same as HIST 335, WGSS 335.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 340 Topics in Modern Jewish Literature: _____
This course treats Jewish literature in English or English translation in the 20th and 21st centuries either as a broad survey or according to specific themes. May be repeated for credit. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 341 Hitler and Nazi Germany
An examination of the rise of Hitler and Nazism, beginning with the breakdown of 19th century culture in the First World War and continuing through the failure of democracy under the Weimar Republic. The course will also discuss the impact of Nazism on Germany and how Nazism led to the Second World War and the Holocaust. (Same as HIST 341.) LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Denning, Andrew
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 28109
LEC Sternberg, Frances
W 06:00-08:30 PM REGN 163 - EDWARDS
3 21128

JWSH 395 Study Abroad Topics in Jewish Studies: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Jewish Studies at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 490 Directed Study in Jewish Studies
Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Perelmutter, Renee
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 22955
IND Younger, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 16527

JWSH 491 Directed Study in Jewish Studies, Honors
Honors version of JWSH 490. Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. IND.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Younger, John
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 13711

JWSH 570 Studies in Judaism
A study of the major intellectual sources of the Jewish tradition from the Mishna, Talmud, Midrash, prayerbook, philosophers, the Zohar, and the Shulchan Aruch. (Same as REL 570.) Prerequisite: A course in Religious Studies or Jewish Studies numbered 300 or above. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 572 Jewish Folklore
Jewish folklore is extraordinarily rich and varied. From folktales to riddles, from legends about the exalted rabbis to irreverent jokes, folklore is central to the Jewish way of life. This course traces the extent to which oral elements appear in traditional Jewish literary texts such as the Bible; read and discuss folktales, and examine minor genres such as proverbs, riddles and jokes. Topics include the supernatural beings of Jewish folklore dybbuks, seductive female demons, and golems. Students acquire theoretical tools with which to analyze folklore (Jewish or otherwise), read stories, watch movies, and collect samples of folklore from informants. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

JWSH 600 Advanced Topics in Jewish Studies: _____
Examination of advanced topics in Jewish Studies. May be repeated if topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zeedan, Rami
M 02:30-05:00 PM WES 4035 - LAWRENCE
3 28481

JOURNALISM

JOUR 590 International Journalism
This course explores print, broadcast and online media in industrialized and developing nations. It examines how government rules and restrictions affect press freedoms, examines the effects of technology on access to information, explores how the U.S. media cover news in foreign countries, explores how foreign media cover news events in the United States, and examines coverage of critical current events. The goal of the course is to make students aware of the effects of mass media in a global economy. Prerequisite: Eight hours of Journalism. LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Vu, Hong
W 04:00-06:30 PM WES 4007 - LAWRENCE
3 18426

JOUR 613 International Strategic Communications
This course examines the process by which professional promotional communicators operate in a global multicultural environment. It aims to instill an appreciation for the challenges in crossing cultures, beginning with research and continuing through examining or creating culturally appropriate messages to be delivered in country-specific ways. The course covers differences among cultures and their communication styles, economic systems, demographics, politics, regulatory environment, research practices and media systems. Through case studies and projects, this course gives students a framework from which to sort through the challenges of global marketing communications. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

LAW

LAW 841 Chinese Law
This course will explore the role of law in contemporary Chinese society from a historical and comparative perspective. This course complements (but is independent of) Law 879. The focus of the course is on China's administrative and legal institutions and legal reform efforts since 1978, with some coverage of China's traditional legal order and the historical influences on China's legal institutions and attitudes toward law from the early twentieth century to the present. Specific topics in modern Chinese law will vary but may include contract, property, criminal, business, intellectual property, environmental, and labor law, wand human rights. Due to the volume of material we will cover in a limited time, the legal systems of Greater China (Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan) will not be covered in this course. No Chinese language skill is necessary for this course and not prior familiarity with China or East Asia is assumed. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2019 semester.

LINGUISTICS

LING 106 Introductory Linguistics
Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as ANTH 106). LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gabriele, Alison
MW 12:00-12:50 PM WES 3140 - LAWRENCE
3 16137
DIS
Th 08:00-08:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 19199
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 223 - LAWRENCE
3 22483
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28398
DIS
Th 09:00-09:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 16138
DIS
Th 10:00-10:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24279
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 22484
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 19608
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 225 - LAWRENCE
3 28399
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24280
DIS
F 01:00-01:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24281
DIS
F 02:00-02:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28396
DIS
F 03:00-03:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28397
LEC Zhang, Jie
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM BL 207 - LAWRENCE
3 28468

LING 106 Introductory Linguistics
Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as ANTH 106). LEC.
Fall 2019
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gabriele, Alison
MW 12:00-12:50 PM WES 3140 - LAWRENCE
3 16137
DIS
Th 08:00-08:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 19199
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM FR 223 - LAWRENCE
3 22483
DIS
F 09:00-09:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 28398
DIS
Th 09:00-09:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 16138
DIS
Th 10:00-10:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24279
DIS
F 10:00-10:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 22484
DIS
F 11:00-11:50 AM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 19608
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM FR 225 - LAWRENCE
3 28399
DIS
F 12:00-12:50 PM BL 206 - LAWRENCE
3 24280